it could take you more hours to arrive your destination. [at your destination]

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reginaregina

Senior Member
Chinese
Buses seems cheaper. But once you factor in the food you'll need on your trip, about the only advantage that bus travel has is that you get to watch a lot of scenery. Once you get stuck in traffic, it could take you more hours to arrive your destination.
This is a paragraph I wrote, is the bold correct? Thank you
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    We don't proofread in this forum. That is, we don't just check over your sentence for errors. If you tell us why you are asking about that sentence, we will have a starting point for our discussion. :)

    What part of the sentence worries you, reginaregina?
     

    reginaregina

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    We don't proofread in this forum. That is, we don't just check over your sentence for errors. If you tell us why you are asking about that sentence, we will have a starting point for our discussion. :)

    What part of the sentence worries you, reginaregina?
    I want to say, it could take you extra hours to arrive your destination. but does it sound strange to natives? So I say, it could take your more hours to arrive destination. but I am afraid it still sounds strange.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Yes, that is a very good question.

    If you want to emphasize that it your trip could be many hours longer,
    you could say:
    it could take you hours longer to arrive at your destination.
    or
    it could take you much longer to arrive at your destination.
    If it will be longer, but not so much longer you could say
    it could take you longer to arrive your at destination.
    [Note: I would also say: "Busses seem cheaper." Because 'busses' is plural it takes the verb form we use for plural subjects. If it were one bus, I would say "The bus seems cheaper".]

    Later edit: It would be arrive at your destination. We don't use 'arrive' with a direct object.
    (I missed this until it was pointed out to me.)
     
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