It cuts through the front lawn

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Tyrion Lann

Senior Member
INDIA -Hindi
Because just beyond the ivy the sidewalk curves, following the outside of the school parking lot. It cuts through the front lawn and into the main building. It leads through the front doors and turns into a hallway, which meanders between rows of lockers and classrooms on both sides......

source :- 13 Reasons Why.

I couldn't follow the above one bit. Is the use of 'it' for the sidewalk? If yes, How could a sidewalk cut through a lawn, or lead to the front gate and turn into a hallway?
please explain it.
thanks.
 
  • kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It seems to be figurative language. It obviously can't do that for real. One leads to the other, one doesn't become the other in a true physical sense.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    See also cut from our dictionary: :)

    to pass, go, or come, esp. in the most direct way (usually fol. by across, through, in, etc.):to cut across an empty lot.
     

    Tyrion Lann

    Senior Member
    INDIA -Hindi
    What I didn't get is the use of "it". However, I can understand the soul idea of the passage, but the use of the sidewalk seems odd to me.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Because just beyond the ivy the sidewalk curves, following the outside of the school parking lot. It cuts through the front lawn and into the main building. It leads through the front doors and turns into a hallway, which meanders between rows of lockers and classrooms on both sides......

    source :- 13 Reasons Why.

    I couldn't follow the above one bit. Is the use of 'it' for the sidewalk? If yes, How could a sidewalk cut through a lawn, or lead to the front gate and turn into a hallway?
    please explain it.
    thanks.
    (1) "It" refers to the sidewalk.
    (2) A sidewalk can cut through a lawn. It's not unusual language.
    (3) The original says front doors not front gate.
    (4) A path or road or sidewalk can lead to some place. That is normal language.
    (5) It is an odd phrase to say that a sidewalk continues through the front doors and that it turns into a hallway. I would not use that idea - I suppose it is a quirk of the author.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    It's perfectly common in English to refer to roads, sidewalks, rail tracks, footprints, animal trails, etc. cutting through, i.e. making a path across, a described piece of ground.
    See the example in the free dictionary:
    cut through (something)
    1. To slice something and penetrate its surface.I don't think that knife is sharp enough to cut through the fruit's tough rind.
    2. To move across an area, often as a shortcut.I'm sick of all these kids cutting through my yard to get to the school down the street.
    [cross-posted]
     
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