It depends on how many years you 'have worked' for the corporation you 'were' in.

Mike2947

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi

Is the tense of my sentence suitable? I guess that instead of "were" I need to say "have worked". Yes? Or this one is correct as well?
"In my country the retirement is not based on how old you are. It depends on how many years you have worked for the corporation you were in."



Regards,
 
  • panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    There is a clash between "have worked", which indicates you are still working, and "were in", which indicates that you are no longer in that corporation.
    Change to:
    "... how many years you worked for the corporation you were in,"

    or "... how many years you work for the corporation you are in,"

    or "... how many years you have worked for the corporation you are in."

    Of these, the third is most appropriate for the context given (the others would fit in different contexts).
     

    Mike2947

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thank you:)

    Does "I have worked in X corporation" mean I'm still working?Cant I use present perfect for some experiences that I have had in the past and now we can see their results?
    Cant I say "I have worked in many corporation such as X,Y,Z,..."; I guess that this one is stating some of the work experiences and it does not necessarily mean that you are still working in these mentioned corporations.
    So what about "I have been working in X corporation". I guess this one indicates that I started my work at X Corporation some time ago and I'm still working in X corporation.
     

    panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Ah, but now you have completely changed the context.

    In the context of the sentences in the first post, "have worked" strongly suggests that you are still working for this corporation.

    In the very different context of the sentences in post #3, where you are talking about your accumulated work experience, "I have worked in ..." clearly refers to at least some completed periods in the past.

    "I have been working in ..." does, indeed, indicate that you are still working there.
     

    Mike2947

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Ah, but now you have completely changed the context.

    In the context of the sentences in the first post, "have worked" strongly suggests that you are still working for this corporation.

    In the very different context of the sentences in post #3, where you are talking about your accumulated work experience, "I have worked in ..." clearly refers to at least some completed periods in the past.

    "I have been working in ..." does, indeed, indicate that you are still working there.
    Oh, I got it :) I distinguished the differences now!
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    To me (AE speaker), working "for the corporation you are/were in" sounds clumsy and I would say something like "It depends on how many years you have worked for your employer"
     
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