It doesn't half because a fuss

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alvarado

New Member
Español (España)
alguien puede decirme lo que significa esta frase? muchas gracias
"it doesn´t half because a fuss"
what does it mean?thanks you for your help
 
  • Snita

    Senior Member
    Spanish Spain
    Hola
    ¿Estás seguro de que la frase es así?
    Para mí tendría sentido 'It/She/He doesn´t half cause a fuss', que sería algo como "Vaja jaleo/alboroto/escándalo que lía/causa/arma" (etc de opciones)
    Espero que te sirva
    Ssaludos
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I agree with Snita that it should be 'cause', not 'because'. This could be just a typo. Alternatively, perhaps it is a 'hypercorrect' form - we are told we should write 'cos' as 'because', so why not 'cause', which some people pronounce the same as 'cos'?
     

    GiggLiden

    Senior Member
    English US
    alvarado said:
    alguien puede decirme lo que significa esta frase? muchas gracias
    "it doesn´t half because a fuss"
    what does it mean?thanks you for your help
    It sounds like something overheard ... BADLY overheard or worse yet, badly spoken.

    My strong suspicion is that is was ORIGINALLY (in English) ...

    "she doesn't have to cause a fuss"
    No tiene que armar un escándalo

    (if not, send it back, and we'll give you a new guess)
    :)
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    COLsass said:
    No, because "cause" is the verb and not a derivative of because in this case.
    I didn't explain clearly what I meant by my 'hypercorrection' theory.

    The author is in his office and wishes to write 'It doesn't half cause a fuss' (which is a perfectly everyday expression, at least in British English, meaning 'It causes a lot of trouble').
    The author is not highly literate, and asks: 'Hey boss, how do you spell cause?'
    The boss answers: 'Don't write 'cos! You should never write 'cos, you should write because.'
    So the author writes 'It doesn't half because a fuss'.
    Admittedly, this is a long shot, but hypercorrection has created equally absurd results in the past.
     

    COLsass

    Senior Member
    se16teddy said:
    I didn't explain fully what I meant by my 'hypercorrection' theory.

    The author is in his office and wishes to write 'It doesn't half cause a fuss' (which is a perfectly everyday expression, at least in British English, meaning 'It causes a lot of trouble').
    The author is not highly literate, and asks: 'Hey boss, how do you spell cause?'
    The boss answers: 'Don't write 'cos! You should never write 'cos, you should write because.'
    So the author writes 'It doesn't half because a fuss'.
    Admittedly, this is a long shot, but hypercorrection has created equally absurd results in the past.
    Oooh, I like your clever hyper correction explanation. It's so meta.

    Though as your point seems to imply, we're probably spending more time piecing together an understanding than the original writer spent crafting such a delightful phrase.
     

    moirag

    Senior Member
    English, England
    I´d just like to point out the meaning of "it doesn´t half", which is common in Britain, at least - maybe other members can tell us if it´s used in their countries. If something "isn´t half" or "doesn´t half" that means that it IS or DOES fully, wholely, entirely. "It isn´t half hot" means it is very hot. "It doesn´t half cause a fuss" ( which I also suspect is the correct version) means it causes a lot of fuss.
     

    GiggLiden

    Senior Member
    English US
    after all this half-fuss about not causing one, I'd be inclined to put the expression into the same OUT-basket as "being only a little bit pregnant."

    Monthy Python, where ARE you ?!?!?
    :)
     
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