It drizzles

Włoskipolak 72

Senior Member
Polish
If it is drizzling, light rain and mist come out of the sky.
How do you say it drizzles in your language ?
Thanks!

Polish;

it drizzles = mży , dżdży , siąpi
spit = to rain or snow in light

verb = mżyć , dżdżyć , siąpić

dżdża = rain , deszcz = deżdż , dżdże, ( plural, old Polish )

verbs;
mżyć = świecić słabym światłem ( glow dimly )
mżeć = migotać’, ‘ukazywać się niewyraźnie’, ‘śnić na jawie’, ‘śnić’ ( to flicker ',' to appear indistinctly ',' to daydream ',' to dream ')

noun
Dżdża [ʤ̑ːa] , mżawka [mʒafka] , drobny deszcz [dɛʃʧ] = drizzle
Dżdżownica = rainworm , ( earthworm )

To tell you the truth dżdżyć is quite difficult to pronunce, even for some polish people..! :D
 
  • Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Cymraeg/Welsh

    to drizzle: (in fact, 'drizzling')

    1
    bwrw glaw mân
    - casting fine rain

    2
    gwlithlawio
    - dew-raining
    briwlan [glaw] - shredding [rain]
    ffluwchan - raining in a dust-like manner
    brycho - spotting
    briwlach - shredding
    picach - pecking
    lleitho - dampening

    3
    pigo bwrw -
    pecking casting
    smwcian - light raining
    smwcian bwrw - light rain casting
    gwlithan - dewing

    Group 1 - Ordinary, everyday expression
    Group 2 - Dialectical South, South East and South West Wales
    Group 3 - Dialectical North East and North West Wales
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    Spanish:

    Verb: lloviznar, chispear, pintear, mollinear, molliznear. Regional within Spain: orvallar (variant: orballar). There are other verbs that are used just in some countries in the Americas like garuar, paramar, pringar, serenar...

    Noun: llovizna. Regional within Spain: orvallo (variant: orballo). Chirimiri (variant: sirimiri). There's also calabobos for the one that lasts a long time. Other terms: mollizna, mollina. There are other terms that are used just in some countries in the Americas like garúa, seresere (variant: cerecere), tapayagua, chischis, silampa, pelo de gato...
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Catalan

    Nouns:​
    plugim, ploviscó (or ploviscol), plovineig;​
    gotellim;​
    brusca, brusquina;​
    xim-xim;​
    roina
    ruixim
    mullinet
    ramitxó
    repix

    Verbs:​
    ploviscar or plovisquejar, plovinejar;​
    gotellimar;​
    brusquejar or brusquinejar;​
    roinar or roinejar
    repixar
     
    Greek:

    Drizzle (noun): «Ψιχάλα» [p͡siˈxa.la] (fem.) < Koine 3rd declension deverbative fem. noun «ψεκάς» psĕkás (nom. sinɡ.), «ψεκάδος» psĕkádŏs (ɡen. sinɡ.), also «ψακάς» psăkás --> drop of rain, particle, drizzle (of unknown etymoloɡy, possibly Pre-Greek), contaminated with Koine neut. noun «ψίχαλον» psíkʰalŏn, diminutive of 3rd declension masc. or fem. noun «ψίξ» psíks (nom. sinɡ.), «ψιχός» psĭkʰós --> crumb, morsel, bit (of unknown etymoloɡy).

    Drizzle (v.): «Ψιχαλίζω» [p͡si.xaˈli.zō] < «ψιχάλα» (see above).

    It drizzles/it's drizzling: «Ψιχαλίζει» [p͡si.xaˈli.zi] (3rd p. sing. Present indicative).
     

    Stoggler

    Senior Member
    UK English
    There is also the word ‘mizzle’ in (British) English, which is synonymous with drizzle. I think it’s mostly a regionalism these days, but I have heard it.
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    @Stoggler . I think it's a portmanteau word: mist + drizzle = mizzle (cf 'Scotch mist'). I too have heard it once or twice on the weather forecast following the BBC news (by Jim Bacon, perhaps?) - but that was some time ago. (It may also of course be a regionalism.)

    Trivial point number 328b: Jim Bacon's twin brother, Dick, has been a fellow member of our Advanced Conversation French class for many years. (The family is from Norfolk, originally.)
     
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    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    Macedonian:

    роси (rósi); мршори (mŕšori), мршоли (mŕšoli), мошори (móšori), мошоли (móšoli); v. 3p.sg. = "it drizzles"

    "Rósi" is usually used for rain, and "mŕšori/móšoli" for snow and rain.
     
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    Kazimir Lenz

    New Member
    Bulgarian
    Bulgarian:

    роси (rosi), denominal from rosa 'dew' (as in Macedonian);

    ръми (rŭmi), usually considered onomatopoeic, but cf. Lithuanian rimti 'to calm down, quieten' (in that case the Bulgarian verb would go back to *rĭměti or *rĭmiti).
     

    Włoskipolak 72

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Catalan

    Nouns:​
    plugim, ploviscó (or ploviscol), plovineig;​
    gotellim;​
    brusca, brusquina;​
    xim-xim;​
    roina
    ruixim
    mullinet
    ramitxó
    repix

    Verbs:​
    ploviscar or plovisquejar, plovinejar;​
    gotellimar;​
    brusquejar or brusquinejar;​
    roinar or roinejar
    repixar
    Gracias Penyafort !

    Are all of them ordinary expressions or some of them ( nouns ) are also dialectical or synonyms ?
     
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    Włoskipolak 72

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Polish

    The main verbs ( no dialect forms ) , to drizzle :

    dżdżyć
    mżyć
    siąpić
    rosić



    Synonyms ( verbs )

    siać - w odniesieniu do delikatnego deszczu ( in relation to the gentle rain )
    padać drobnymi kroplami
    kropić
    zraszać
    kapać
    popadywać
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    There is also the word ‘mizzle’ in (British) English, which is synonymous with drizzle. I think it’s mostly a regionalism these days, but I have heard it.
    Dutch (or Flemish) miezerig weer (mizzl-y weather), mizeren --- but I do not think mist is included... Motregen is also possilble, something like -rain in the shape of crushed debris, so I read in the etymology books... ;-)
     
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    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    I do not think mist is included...
    Thanks for pointing out it because thanks to your comment I realizaed that I overlooked that mist isn't included in any of the Spanish words that I quoted on 4 so it's time now to say it in order to avoid misunderstandings.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    There is also the word ‘mizzle’ in (British) English, which is synonymous with drizzle. I think it’s mostly a regionalism these days, but I have heard it.
    I've heard that from someone from the the lower Mississippi region of the US. To him it was different from drizzle, and meant the precipitation that appears when when fog or mist (not clouds) becomes supersaturated with moisture.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    Small point of information: In AmE the verbs for precipitation are present continuous, not present simple.
    it's raining, it's drizzling, it's snowing, it's sleeting, etc. I don't know about mizzle per se but I have heard 'it's misting.'
     

    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    I must confess that simple rows of synonyms with no explanations, such as have been given for Polish and Catalan, don't really help, quite on the contrary they confuse - it's best to know just one word for a thing than not to know which of the half dozen words to choose in any given situation. Perhaps these Russian examples can serve as a rough model for further replies:

    мороси́т v. impers., мо́рось n.- it rains in small droplets that tend to hang in the air and get easily blown by the wind. Often comes with a fog, for which there's the regional noun мга, cognate to Pol. mży and to Ru. мгла "dark fog, mist", and that I've never encountered. Colloquially, any drizzling kind of rain. Also и́зморось, which has now been commonly reinterpreted as и́зморозь from моро́з "frost" and designates its winter weather counterpart which results from night fog, typically sunny and in the morning.

    дожди́т v. impers. - it rains lightly, intermittently and for a prolonged period of time. Might be improperly etymologised as denoting any kind of rain, which is properly идёт дождь "the rain goes".

    ка́пает
    v. impers - it comes down in drops.

    бры́зжет v. impers., commonly pron. with /ʑ:/ - it sprinkles or drizzles incessantly.

    накра́пывает v. impers. - describes the way the raindrops hit the dry ground with an audible thumping sound. Often said of the start of raining.

    грибно́й дождь, idiomatic n. phrase "mushroom rain" - a light, warm, brief summer rain with sunshine.

    си́тный дождь, idiomatic n. phrase, си́тничек n. "sieve rain" - a steady kind of rain that looks like it's been passed through a sieve.
     
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    Terio

    Senior Member
    Français (Québec)
    As for French, il bruine is by far the most standard. The other ones are regional or colloquial.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    commonly pron. with /ʑ:/
    That dated Moscow pronunciation is far from "common", in my opinion (yes, it contains /*ždž/ etymologically, so it comes with /ʑ:/ if the speaker has that phoneme in his speech, but it's another matter).

    Speaking about the words, I hardly ever met "дождит" in live speech, as much as "ситный дождь" (which sounds dialectal).

    "Грибной дождь" basically has two possible meanings:
    1. a light summer drizzle (even without the sun);
    2. a sunshower (regardless of the intensity).
     
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    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    French:
    Il pleuviote
    Il pleuvote
    Il pleuvasse
    Could you consider the -(i)ote V verbal diminutives? Or could it refer to reiteration, repetition? Do you associate any meaning with the -asse ending? --- I recognize something that in -miez-er-en, where the -er- is the same as the one in tweet > twitter (repetition, short tweets)...
     

    Terio

    Senior Member
    Français (Québec)
    They both are verbal suffixes that are used to form derivates.

    I am not a specialist, but Grévisse gives to - oter a diminutive or frequentative connotation and to -asser a augmentative or pejorative connotation. You may find various examples at :

    Suffixe OTER | Mots en -OTER
     
    There's also the neologism in Greek of «ψιλόβροχο» [p͡siˈlɔ.vrɔ.xɔ] (neut.) --> lit. thin rain, which is the light rain, while the previous word I posted («ψιχάλα») is the rain in small droplets.
    «Ψιλόβροχο» = compound; oblique «ψιλο-» [p͡si.lɔ-] as first element in compounds < adj. «ψιλός, -λή, -λό» [p͡siˈlɔs] (masc.), [p͡siˈli] (fem.), [p͡siˈlɔ] (neut.) --> thin, tenuous, fine-spun < Classical adj. «ψῑλός, -λή, -λόν» psīlós (masc.), psīlḗ (fem.), psīlón (neut.) --> bald, bare, smooth, exposed (of unknown etymology, probably Pre-Greek) + fem. «βροχή» [vrɔˈçi] --> rain, moistering, indentation < Classical deverbative fem. noun «βροχή» brŏkʰḗ (idem), o-grade of Classical v. «βρέχω» brékʰō (> in MoGr «βρέχω» [ˈvre.xɔ]) --> to wet, drench (PIE *mergʰ- to wet, moisten cf Ltv. merga, soft rain).
    Impersonal v.: «Ψιλοβρέχει» [p͡si.lɔˈvre.çi] --> it thin-rains (3rd p. sing. Present Indic.).
     
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