It figures that she’d be mad at you, after what you did.

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Vronsky

Senior Member
Russian - Russia
Hi there,
The following is an example sentence from the Longman Dictionary, the entry "figure"

It figures that she’d be mad at you, after what you did.​

I wander if the the phrase "what you did" refers to an actual or imaginary action.
Thank you in advance.
 
  • Vronsky

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    The person really did that and "would" expresses conjecture here, I believe.
    Thanks.
    I think that for conjecture it would be better with might: "It figures that she might be mad at you, after what you did."
     

    SevenDays

    Senior Member
    Spanish/AE
    Hi there,
    The following is an example sentence from the Longman Dictionary, the entry "figure"

    It figures that she’d be mad at you, after what you did.​

    I wander if the the phrase "what you did" refers to an actual or imaginary action.
    Thank you in advance.
    "After what you did" refers to an actual action, as far as the speaker is concerned. Or at least, it's what the speaker takes as factual. If he wants to pull back from the judgment implied in it, he could add a qualifier: After what you supposedly did. Now, if the poor fellow in question says "But I didn't go anything, she's just imagining things," then we would say that it's an imaginary action. Of course, if "she" then tells you, "don't believe him, he's always lying. He did do it and I have proof; that's why I'm mad at him," then you are back where you started: it's an actual action.

    In other words, context matters. Language can only take you so far.

    If you are focusing on might vs would (might be mad at you; would be mad at you), then that's conjecture as far as her being mad; not conjecture about the phrase "after what you did." Might lessens the impact of what the speaker is saying (there's less certainty involved), as would, in my view, is more assertive in nature. It follows that, yes, might is more conjecture. But if the speaker is indeed making an assertion, then I see "would" as a better fit. However, given that the phrasing starts with "It figures" (a construction conclusive in its own way), then the line that separates "might" from "would" may not be all that significant.
     
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    Forero

    Senior Member
    Hi there,
    The following is an example sentence from the Longman Dictionary, the entry "figure"

    It figures that she’d be mad at you, after what you did.​

    I wander if the the phrase "what you did" refers to an actual or imaginary action.
    Thank you in advance.
    Probably an actual action, and "after" probably means "because of".

    Context might tell us "what you did" is imaginary, but the comma makes that unlikely.
     

    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    "It figures that she’d be mad at you, after what you did."
    I would take that to mean that she is or was in fact mad at the person.

    = It is understandable / natural that she is / was mad at you, after what you did.
    or:
    She is / was mad at you. That is what one would have expected.
     

    loviii

    Senior Member
    Russian
    a) Is "she'd be mood at you" in indicative mood?

    b) If we can't say whether "being mad at you" is still ongoing or has already passed, then "It figures that she’d be mad at you, after what you did." can be equal to
    both "It figures that she is probably mad at you, after what you did."
    and "It figures that she was probably mad at you, after what you did.",
    right?

    Thanks!
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    a) Is "she'd be mood at you" in indicative mood?

    b) If we can't say whether "being mad at you" is still ongoing or has already passed, then "It figures that she’d be mad at you, after what you did." can be equal to
    both "It figures that she is probably mad at you, after what you did."
    and "It figures that she was probably mad at you, after what you did.",
    right?

    Thanks!
    This "would" is not about probability per se and not about a specific instance, past or present. It is more about the speaker's expectations (concerning her) and the kind of thing you did.

    We often use "would" this way to express expectations:

    A man named "John G. Vowell" would be a dentist, wouldn't he, and Mr. Shoemaker would be a farrier, wouldn't he?

    Mad Madame Mim (some sort of sorceress): "Say, lad, did you know that I can make myself uglier yet?"
    Young King Arthur: "That would be some trick."
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It figures that she’d be mad at you, after what you did.

    This is a standalone sentence in the dictionary but it certainly had a sentence that came before it and, in my opinion, the kind of sentence that fits and that I would expect to see there is something like this:

    Tim: I found out Jane is mad at me.
    Elaine: It figures that she’d be mad at you, after what you did.


    The premise behind the whole thing is that these are a group of people who know each other. Elaine already knows what Tim did. Maybe Tim did something embarrassing to Jane at the party they were all at the night before. So when Elaine finds out the next day that Jane is mad at Tim, she is not at all surprised. If Tim had done that same thing to her, Elaine would have been upset with him, too.

    "It figures" means that it's not surprising to Elaine.

    "she would be mad" means that Elaine knows that the thing Tim did would probably result in any normal person being mad, including Jane. She didn't know Jane was mad until Tim told her, but it was not hard to guess that Jane would be in an angry mood even after she left the party.

    "after what you did" is a reference to an event that really happened (that Tim did) and that Elaine witnessed since, in this example, they are friends and were both at the party.

    Saying "she might be mad" is possible, but it would indicate Elaine thought that whatever Tim did was less serious. Because of the seriousness of what Tim did, Elaine thinks it's more than just possible, she thinks it's very, very likely that it would result in Jane being angry.

    And Jane is still angry. That's what Tim has found out this morning and what he has just told Elaine. Jane is currently mad at him (and presumably has been since the moment he did what he did). And Elaine is not surprised.
     
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