It has a big sound <to it>.

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emre aydın

Senior Member
Turkish
A famous guitar player who's a friend of the owner of a guitar store, helps a customer and hands him a guitar. As the customer holds and looks at the guitar the famous guitar player says:

See, that's got a good cut. That's that double-o, but it's got a big sound to it. You wanna move your budget a little bit, try the Martin triple-o's. Worth it.

(Nashville, the TV series)

Does the bold part (to it) mean "although it is a double-o and you can't expect it to have a big sound" or have another meaning?

Thanks for your help.
 
  • Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    No, it doesn't add or change the meaning, but is simply used in constructing some phrases of this sort.

    "I like that plan; it's got a nice sound to it."
    "Try this salsa -- it's got quite a kick to it."​
     

    mink-shin

    Senior Member
    Korean - Korea, Republic of
    No, it doesn't add or change the meaning, but is simply used in constructing some phrases of this sort.

    "I like that plan; it's got a nice sound to it."
    "Try this salsa -- it's got quite a kick to it."​
    Thank you for letting me know that it doesn't add or change the meaning, Glenfarclas.

    Actually, before reading your post, I guessed that "to it" is emphasizing the guitar's a peculiarity making sound; the sound made by its string is amplified in its body. :p
     
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