It has a nice feeling to it.

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karlalou

Banned
母国語:日本語
Hi,

I hear people say "It has a nice feeling to it", but why "to it"? Isn't that a redundant?
Does it make a difference if it's just "It has a nice feeling"?
Can it be "It has a nice feeling about it"?
 
  • karlalou

    Banned
    母国語:日本語
    I just remember the sentence alone.. Next time I encounter it I'll try to remember the context. :p
     

    karlalou

    Banned
    母国語:日本語
    I wrote, "I guess someone translated it poetically and said 雨に唄えば. It's concise and rhythmical and has a nice feel to it". Is this correct?

    I don't know where I got this.. and I want a confirmation that I'm using it correctly. I also searched the net a little and got this: "This house really has a nice feel to it,” others visitors frequently said." (by Erin Scullion, "I Need You to Know: A Bouquet of Stories for My Son", 2015)

    Or "It's a nice place and it has a nice feeling to it and that hasn't changed." (by Jed McKenna, 2009)

    It seems like usually relates to a place like a house. I want to especially make sure that the 'it' of 'to it' means the subject of the sentence, or it means something else like atmosphere..?
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    "It has xyz to it." Describes an attribute. The preposition is being used in a colloquial way. Very normal in AE and perhaps BE.

    There is a good feel to it.:tick:
    It has a nice feel to it.:tick:

    But it is informal.
     

    karlalou

    Banned
    母国語:日本語
    Thank you, RedwoodGrove. :)

    I also heard 'about' is used.
    I googled it now and got some results, much less in number than 'to' but like " 'It has a nice feel about it'. His dad will 'set up a fund' to help pay for University". (By Stephen J. Ball, 2006)
     
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