It has never been snowy in this city.

8769

Senior Member
Japanese and Japan
I am putting some Japanese sentences into English. The following is one of them.

I think #1 below is good English. How about #2?
1. It has never snowed in this city.
2. It has never been snowy in this city.

One of my friends say it should be OK, but I’m not sure. What do you think?
 
  • 8769

    Senior Member
    Japanese and Japan
    Thank you for your prompt reply, Copyright.

    I meant #1 for "There has been no snowfall in this city." Could you explain the reason a little bit for not recommending #2?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    All I can suggest is that native English speakers wouldn't say it this way -- especially about a place where it's never snowed at all. It might possibly be used in a humorous way, the same way someone might say "It's never been too rainy here" when speaking of his home in the Sahara. ;)
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I agree with Copyright. This may or may not help, but I understand the key to be the action: to snow (a verb)

    1) It has never snowed. (The actual action of snowing.)

    2) It has never been snowy. ("snowy" is an adjective.)

    Technically 2) is correct, though I would not say it---because it doesn't emphasize the action.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I think both sentences are okay, although they mean different things.

    The first is a flat statement that this city has NEVER had the slightest bit of snow. Ever. Not once. Not for five minutes.

    The second doesn't say that, but to my mind is an observation about the general climate of this city and might be an answer, for example, to a question like, "You grew up in this city. Did you do a lot of sledding when you were a kid?" ("No, it has never been . . . ")
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    The second doesn't say that, but to my mind is an observation about the general climate of this city and might be an answer, for example, to a question like, "You grew up in this city. Did you do a lot of sledding when you were a kid?" ("No, it has never been . . . ")
    Even in that case, I would probably say, "It never snowed very much."
     

    scrotgrot

    Senior Member
    English - English
    A slightly different perspective - for me, it's never been snowy is focusing on the piles of snow on the ground. If you look out of the window one morning at falling snow, you might say it's snowing or it's snowy (today), but for piles on the ground you would look out and say it's snowy (out there).

    A: Do you own snow chains for your car?
    B: It has never been snowy (enough) in this city.

    In general though the first sentence is very much preferable as everyone else has said.
     
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