(It/I) felt like I was climbing a mountain

shorty1

Senior Member
Korean
Hello.


This is a video in a channel I subscribe to on Youtube to study English.
And this is a scene where an Englishman who's tavelling in Korea is stating how spicy food he ate.

...
The chicken's feet was so spicy! So incredibly spicy that it just hit this adrenaline rush in you.
It felt like I was climbing a mountain or jumping off a cliff!
...


I find in some cases 'it feels like...' is used, in other cases 'I feel like...' is used.

I can't tell the difference between them.

I usually use them interchangeably.

Could you teach me this?


Thank you for your help.
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "It" refers to the item that caused the feeling - here, the spiciness of the food.

    "I" refers to the person who has the feeling.

    Use whichever fits the meaning of your sentence.
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    "It" refers to the item that caused the feeling - here, the spiciness of the food.

    "I" refers to the person who has the feeling.

    Use whichever fits the meaning of your sentence.

    Thank you very much, Egmont. :)

    I'll take it this way:

    'It felt like I was climbing...' is focused on the description of the spiciness of the food.

    'I felt like I was climbing...' is focused on the description of the feeling I got when eating it.


    If I got it wrong, correct me, please.
     
    Last edited:

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    For me they mean almost exactly the same the same, with a slight shift of emphasis onto the person having the experience when you use "I".

    I would say that "it" doesn't actually refer to the food or the spiciness of the food. I hear "it" as something like a "dummy it": it felt like I was climbing=I had this feeling that I was climbing.
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    For me they mean almost exactly the same the same, with a slight shift of emphasis onto the person having the experience when you use "I".

    I would say that "it" doesn't actually refer to the food or the spiciness of the food. I hear "it" as something like a "dummy it": it felt like I was climbing=I had this feeling that I was climbing.
    Thank you very much, velisarius. :)

    Oh, now I remember this vaguely.

    So 'I felt like I was climbing a mountain or jumping off a cliff' sounds relatively a little more Colloquial or informal than ''It felt like I was climbing a mountain or jumping off a cliff', right?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    [...]

    So 'I felt like I was climbing a mountain or jumping off a cliff' sounds relatively a little more Colloquial or informal than ''It felt like I was climbing a mountain or jumping off a cliff', right?
    I don't perceive such a difference, though in formal writing you may want to sound more impersonal. In both sentences you are mentioning yourself, so neither sentence sounds very impersonal.

    That use of "felt like" rather than "felt as if/though" is rather colloquial.
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I don't perceive such a difference, though in formal writing you may want to sound more impersonal. In both sentences you are mentioning yourself, so neither sentence sounds very impersonal.

    That use of "felt like" rather than "felt as if/though" is rather colloquial.
    Thanks for your time. :)

    I've understood what you mean.

    The difference between 'I felt like...' and 'It felt like...' has nothing to do with the sentence being colloquial.

    I need to memorize in your first post what you said--For me they mean almost exactly the same the same, with a slight shift of emphasis onto the person having the experience when you use "I".
     

    shorty1

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Something curious came up.


    "It/I felt like I was climbing a mountain."

    I'd like to change the 'like' clause to 'as if' clause.

    #1. It/I felt as if I was climbing a mountain.
    #2. It/I felt as if I had been climbing a mountain.

    I think both sound natural but past perfect continuous is grammatically correct because this is just the speaker's imagination(an idea contrary to reality in the past).


    What's your opinion?


    Thank you for your help.
     
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