It is a chance for you to do

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Gabriel Malheiros

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hi, there

I'd like to know if I can use "chance" in the sense of opportuinity. Like:


Traveling across Europe is like having an encounter with the past. It is not coincidence that it is, along with Asia and Africa, called The Old World. It is also a chance for you to immerse in the cultural diversity of this impressive region that is formed by a wide range of peoples."

Is this wrong, guys?

Thank you for all your help.
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "Immerse" is a good verb to use here, but it is transitive so it needs an object. It should be "... immerse yourself in ..." or "... immerse oneself in ..."
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I prefer 'opportunity' here, but 'chance' doesn't sound very wrong.
    Travelling across Europe will give you the opportunity / a chance to ...

    Notice that immerse must have an object in English, active mode, so you need a reflexive pronoun, as in other European languages.
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    I prefer 'opportunity' here, but 'chance' doesn't sound very wrong.
    Travelling across Europe will give you the opportunity / a chance to ...

    Notice that immerse must have an object in English, active mode, so you need a reflexive pronoun, as in other European languages.
    Thank you a lot, Hermione. I will change it to "opportunity". I noticed you wrote "Travelling across Europe will give you the opportunity to.." instead of "It is also an opportunity for you to..".. Is the latter wrong?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I wouldn't say it's absolutely wrong, but it makes more sense to use "gives" or "provides" than "is", because logically you can't equate travelling with a chance or opportunity. Rather the opportunity comes from the travelling.
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    I wouldn't say it's absolutely wrong, but it makes more sense to use "gives" or "provides" than "is", because logically you can't equate travelling with a chance or opportunity. Rather the opportunity comes from the travelling.
    But, in terms of language, is it odd? It is a chance/opportunity for you to do something?... I jsut want to know. I will use "gives you the opportunity" anyway.

    Thank you, Edinburgher!
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    :thumbsup::thumbsup: to Edinburgher's #6.
    I also changed the opening word 'It' to 'Travelling ... '.
    You might want to think very carefully why I did this and ask on a new thread about it. :)
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    :thumbsup::thumbsup: to Edinburgher's #6.
    I also changed the opening word 'It' to 'Travelling ... '.
    You might want to think very carefully why I did this and ask on a new thread about it. :)
    My guess is that "travelling" and "it" are too far apart, so one can not tell for sure whether I am referring to "travelling", "old world" or any other thing. But I will think further about it. Thank you for all your help, Hermione Golightly!
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's not terribly odd, no, but if HG changed it, it must have been at least a little bit odd! ;)
    Edinburgher's reasoning is fundamentally sound, as usual, and I will take his comment as a huge compliment,:rolleyes:, despite the ;).

    Here's my modus operandi : I roll the sentences or wording off my tongue and around the crannies of my mind several times, carefully noting my 'idio-ometer' reactions, on the :confused: to :eek: scale, then I go and do something completely different, like reading up on medieval siege warfare; or the Battle of Agincourt 1415, taking in Henry V, one of my historical heroes; and then, for a bit of national identity reassurance, I remind myself of the famed and feared medieval English longbow archers, the "terror of Europe"!

    Only then do I get back to the post.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    My guess is that "travelling" and "it" are too far apart, so one can not tell for sure whether I am referring to "travelling", "old world" or any other thing.
    You've 'got it in one'. :) If it were the lottery you'd be rich.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    My guess is that "travelling" and "it" are too far apart, so one can not tell for sure whether I am referring to "travelling", "old world" or any other thing.
    The particular problem here, in addition to the distance, is that there is another "it" (or even two, but let's ignore the non-specific one that begins the 2nd sentence) between "travelling" and your "it". That "it" clearly refers to "Europe", and we really don't like to overlap the scopes of two different "it"s. So as we scan backwards to see what the last "it" might refer to, then as soon as we find another "it", we tend to want it to refer to the same thing.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    The particular problem here, in addition to the distance, is that there is another "it" (or even two, but let's ignore the non-specific one that begins the 2nd sentence) between "travelling" and your "it". That "it" clearly refers to "Europe", and we really don't like to overlap the scopes of two different "it"s. So as we scan backwards to see what the last "it" might refer to, then as soon as we find another "it", we tend to want it to refer to the same thing.
    :thumbsup: 100%.
     
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