It is coasters/ it is coaster

Bepositive

Member
Korean
I'm so confused about using plural and singular.
I don't know when I should use plural and just noun.

It is coasters.
It is a coaster.
It is coaster.

When you say 'it', you don't use plurals?
Like, it is chocolate! Not chocolates!
 
  • Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    I am sorry, Bepositive, but I don't understand what you are asking.

    Plural subjects require a plural verb -- but what do you mean by "coaster"?
     

    Bepositive

    Member
    Korean
    Those sentences with coasters are examples.

    The thing that I wanna know is how you use plural, singular and just noun.

    I always get confused when I make sentences in English. For example, I'm at a chocolate shop and I want to let my baby know the thing she is looking at is chocolate. I don't know 'It is chocolates' is right or 'It is chocolate' is right or 'It is a chocolate'

    I hope you understand my question.
    Thank you!
     

    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    I understand your question, but you have chosen a poor example. "Chocolate" can be either countable or uncountable, depending on context:
    That is chocolate
    Those are chocolates

    can both be correct, depending on what you are saying.

    Certain foods (for example, rice, or wine) are normally treated as uncountable, and thus use a singular verb:
    Question: What do I see on that dish?
    Answer: It is rice.

    Other foods are normally treated as countable, and use a plural verb:
    Question: What do I see that dish?
    Answer: They are pork chops (or chicken wings, or eclairs, or muffins, or cupcakes, etc.)
     

    Bepositive

    Member
    Korean
    Thank you so much! =) I think I get it clearly now. Thanks for understanding my weird and confusing question and answering it. Have a good one!
     
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