It is overweight! [in an elevator]

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Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

I wonder if it's idiomatic to say "It is overweight" when there are enough people in an elevator when suddenly one comes in?

Thanks a lot
 
  • MattiasNYC

    Senior Member
    Swedish
    I haven't heard anyone say it. I don't think people would really know if an elevator was actually filled with too many people measured by weight. But people sometimes feel that it is too crowded and I have heard people say something like that. But generally I would say it's a tricky thing to say without sounding a bit "aggressive". Perhaps some other Americans can give you some suggestions on how to express it.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    In order to avoid offensiveness, I'd like to give an example of this situation. I have many family members and relatives and usually we share the same elevator and sometimes it is overweight. I guess I can use this expression to mean what I intend to say. Perhaps some AE speakers have a better version.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    So the whole expression will probably be:

    It's overloaded.
    It's beyond its allowed.
    It's beyond its rated capacity.

    Thanks a lot
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    When someone puts a slash (/) between two words or expressions, it means you can choose between them. So ..

    It's overloaded.
    It's beyond its allowed capacity.
    It's beyond its rated capacity.

    Personally, I would say, "Hey, Bobby, that buzzer's telling you something."
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    When an elevator is over its capacity, a buzzer or other alarm sounds to alert those inside that it's not going to move until someone gets off; otherwise, how would you know?
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    You're looking for idiomatic, right?

    If I were on an elevator, and it looked and felt mighty full to me, and the door opened and someone else wanted to get on, I'd say, "Sorry, we've reached capacity. You might want to wait for the next one."

    Other idiomatic choices:

    "Sorry, we're full here."
    "Sorry, there's no more room."

    "It's overweight." sounds wrong. Don't say this.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    If I were on an elevator, and it looked and felt mighty full to me, and the door opened and someone else wanted to get on, I'd say, "Sorry, we've reached capacity. You might want to wait for the next one."
    I would never say this ... as soon as I did, the person is going to step on board anyway, and when no buzzer went off I'd be trapped in a box with a smug guy giving me a withering look and rolling his eyes to everyone else. I just let the buzzer speak for me.
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    He asked for idiomatic. That's what I gave him as it pertains to how I interpreted his question.

    If I were scrunched in an elevator where I couldn't move, I don't care about no stinking buzzer. I'd say what I suggested. If the person got on, I'd get off. Now, you're correct, if there were just a few fat people on board, I wouldn't say anything, either, in that case. I was imagining a very crowded elevator car, not one with three people who weighed over 300 hundred pounds each. Maybe we need clarification now.

    But he didn't say a few heavy people. He said he has MANY family members, and they get on the elevator together. That sounds like a crowded car to me.

    However, maybe I misunderstood. Maybe it's overweight people, as opposed to many, many riders.

    And you've never told someone, "Sorry, we're full here." It hasn't happened but maybe once or twice, but it has happened to me.

    If they're stupid enough not to notice in the first place, I sure do. Buzzer or no buzzer, if they got on, I'd get off.

    And now that I read through this thread again, I'm not sure what exactly is the question. Does he want to know what to say to the person who's trying to squeeze in, or does he just wonder what expression would describe what he's thinking?
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    I want to say to the person who's trying to squeeze in. But Here are two situations: one is that all the people here are my family members, i.e. I know all of them. So I might be funny to say something recommended by Mr. Copy, that sounds interesting. But what if I don't know the one who's trying to come in the elevator? I don't want a fight. I might say things like "It's overloaded" plus a sorry to express my sincerity.

    Whereas, in China, sometimes an elevator doesn't have a buzzer; there usually will be a signal when the elevator is crowded and couldn't contain one more people, so Angel's recommendations are good. But sometimes there does have a buzzer, telling you something is going to happen if you don't get out of the elevator.

    So I think you guys are both correct here.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    A career in diplomacy awaits you, Silver. But in case you decide against it, there's always, "Hey, Bobby, you're too fat. Take the freight elevator."
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    If a lift is overweight, I would tend to say 'we are overloaded/too heavy' or 'there are too many of us for the lift'. This avoids referring specifically to the person who tries to enter the lift.
     
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