<it is seemly in a total stranger to put mister>

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MrRise

Senior Member
Russian
Hello, I was reading a text when I noticed this sentence, which one I really cannot get.

Exactly this part: it is seemly in a total stranger to put mister.

I do not wish to put on airs, but I cannot help feeling that it is seemly in a total stranger to put mister before my name when he addresses me.

Probably it's because of prepositions? Does this sentence mean that a total stanger should say mister when he/she adresses somebody (me)?

Seemly - decent? So it's seemly in a total stranger to put mister or do something and etc.

it is (adverb) in (somebody) to (do something) ? I just have never seen such a construction.

Maybe I try to creat some patterns?

It is seemly in every person to help others when they need it (= help).
It's usual in every person to do what they want to.
It's good in a driver to give a way to a footer.

And.. It's normal in most of people to keep their secrets hidden.

Perhaps.. 100% I made my examples wrong, so I beg you to help me! :)
 
  • Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    It is more polite / respectful for a total stranger to use "Mr <name>" when he adresses me than simply "<name>".
    Seemly is an adjective.
    It is an unusual phrasing, and whereas it could be used in the examples you have made up, there are numerous unrelated mistakes in your examples.
    It is seemly in a man to help others when they need it (simply because it is not idiomatic to use "person" - we only use "in a xxx" when we're talking about a subset of people)
    It is usual in a woman to do what they want
    It is good in a driver to give way to a pedestrian

    It is normal to keep secrets hidden (when we don't want to specify a subset, we don't use "in").
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    it is (adverb adjective) in (somebody) to (do something) ? I just have never seen such a construction.
    Does this sentence mean that a total stranger should say mister when he/she addresses somebody (me)?
    That is the basic meaning - in full, it means
    It is...........seemly...................................in................a total stranger.........to put..................mister...........before........my name when he addresses me.
    It is...the proper/correct thing to do...for/in the case of...a total stranger ...to write or say...[the title] mister....in front of....my name when he addresses me.
     

    MrRise

    Senior Member
    Russian
    It is more polite / respectful for a total stranger to use "Mr <name>" when he adresses me than simply "<name>".
    Seemly is an adjective.
    It is an unusual phrasing, and whereas it could be used in the examples you have made up, there are numerous unrelated mistakes in your examples.
    It is seemly in a man to help others when they need it (simply because it is not idiomatic to use "person" - we only use "in a xxx" when we're talking about a subset of people)
    It is usual in a woman to do what they want
    It is good in a driver to give way to a pedestrian

    It is normal to keep secrets hidden (when we don't want to specify a subset, we don't use "in").
    I have some problems with words subset, and specify it. You mean, a subset, in examples above, a man and woman, and a driver?
    When we want to specify a person type, we use "in", as it's here: It's (adjective) for/in (a person) to (do something).

    But if we do not want to show a person type, but want to say it about all people, it's as here: It is normal to keep secrets hidden = All poeple keep their secrets hidden, and it's normal.
     
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