It is thundering outside.

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  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Hi Veronica, welcome to WRF.

    No, lightning and thundering is always said the other way, "Thunder and lightning" and "Thundering and lightning", so: "Is it thundering and lightning now?"
     
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    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I could say "It's thundering." It's clear that "thundering" is a verb, because the noun is "thunder".
    I could not say "It's thundering and lightning", because "lightning" is a noun. Can we just add -ing, as we did with "thunder"? Is there such a word as "lightninging"?:eek: I don't think there is.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Me neither. I just don't have a verb for 'lightning': :cross:It is lightning / lightening / lightninging. Stick to nouns for this one: There's thunder and lightning.
     

    srk

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It is thundering and lightening.

    From our dictionary:
    lighten
    3. (intransitive) (of lightning) to flash

    From AHD online:
    lighten
    3. To give off flashes of lightning.

    Also in our dictionary:
    lightning
    v.
    • to give off a flash or flashes of lightning: Go inside if it starts to lightning.
     
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    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    You will find a lot of disquiet expressed about using lightning as a verb in To Lightning

    When I think about this, and about very recent experience, I wouldn't say 'It's thundering ...' either.

    There's a thunderstorm ...
    There's thunder and lightning ...
    Did you hear the thunder/see the ligntning ...
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It's a question of usage rather than anything else, in my opinion. As srk notes, it's even noted as a verb in the WR dictionary and I see from the other thread that it's in the OED. I for one will continue to use it.;)
     

    Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    There's something strange in the grey sentence in post # 7: shouldn't it go " Go inside if it stats to LIGHTEN"?
    GS
    PS Sorry for the capitals: no way to find italics on an iPAd.
     

    Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Ta, Lon -- and always glad to read you.
    I did read all the debate, but it still sounds weird: makes me thing of " Come inside if he starts to yelling". But maybe it' s just my grey matter ...
    Best.
    G.
     

    neal41

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "It's thundering and lightning" is something I've always said.;)
    As yet no speaker of AE has commented. I also would say, "It's thundering and lightning." even though it does not conform to the usual rules of syntax. I would never use 'lighten'. Of course, the whole problem can be avoided by using other expressions, as panjandrum suggests.
     

    Uncle Bob

    Senior Member
    British English
    Perhaps the thread title needs changing to remove "outside" (which is not mentioned), I was attracted to it by the idea of it thundering inside:)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    You can often hear thunder when you're inside a building. If there is good sound insulation however, you might not be aware of even a heavy storm going on outside, and someone coming in could say "It's raining/thundering/lightning outside, didn't you notice?"
     

    rituparnahoymoy

    Senior Member
    Assamese -India
    You can often hear thunder when you're inside a building. If there is good sound insulation however, you might not be aware of even a heavy storm going on outside, and someone coming in could say "It's raining/thundering/lightning outside, didn't you notice?"
    Can I use " Thundering without lightning" . I can hear the loud thundering outside.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    We would not use 'thundering', which is a participle from the verb 'to thunder'. We'd use the noun 'thunder'. "I can hear (the) loud thunder". 'Outside' isn't necessary because weather is not inside.

    To use the verb you could say "It's thundering loudly".
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I suggest you stop trying to use the verb 'to thunder'. Focus on learning how to use the noun, ' (the) thunder.
    I can hear the thunder
    The thunder is very loud
    I saw the lightning and now the thunder can be heard.

    Thunder can't be described as "the loud roars of the clouds".
     

    rituparnahoymoy

    Senior Member
    Assamese -India
    I suggest you stop trying to use the verb 'to thunder'. Focus on learning how to use the noun, ' (the) thunder.
    I can hear the thunder
    The thunder is very loud
    I saw the lightning and now the thunder can be heard.

    Thunder can't be described as "the loud roars of the clouds".[/QUOTE

    I am not able to make myself understood. If I have to describe to someone about the event. let's say How is the wheather over there?

    Reply= I can hear the thunder sounds a bit odd to me. Can I say it is thundering loudly right now.
     
    As yet no speaker of AE has commented. I also would say, "It's thundering and lightning.":thumbsup: even though it does not conform to the usual rules of syntax. I would never use 'lighten'. Of course, the whole problem can be avoided by using other expressions, as panjandrum suggests.
    I would also. I see no need to defend the use of "to thunder" as a verb, since it's a verb.:D

    "ligtning" here I can't defend as such, so I'll just say that the whole thing together is a very common AE idiomatic expression.
     
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