It made the Mexican papers.

AlexanderIII

Senior Member
Russian
Dear All,

"Fifty Grand" by Adrian McKinty:

I wasn’t there. It was nothing to do with me. I read about it the next day. It made the Mexican papers.

"I" is the main hero of the novel, Mercado, a policewoman.
"It" is the death of Jack Tyrone, a Hollywood actor, the man who killed Mercado's father in a car accident. Mercado lives in Havana. Jack dies in Hollywood.


Am I right thinking that It made the Mexican papers means this was the event all Mexican papers were writing about? What puzzles me is why Mexican (not Cuban, not USA)?
 
  • Smc6288

    Member
    English - American
    There are two slight alternatives that I see, in addition to the one Copyright mentioned.

    If the main character is currenty in Mexico - then that would be the paper he was reading which mentioned the death.
    Otherwise, Cuban papers might not have mentioned it, but the Mexican papers that the main character reads did. While it was important enough to be in papers outside the US, it wasn't deemed important enough to be in the Cuban papers - but it was in the Mexican papers.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English

    Am I right thinking that It made the Mexican papers means this was the event all Mexican papers were writing about? What puzzles me is why Mexican (not Cuban, not USA)?
    No, there's no indication that it appeared in all the newspapers of Mexico. Moreover, Mexican (or other) newspapers don't "write about" foreign events, especially relatively minor ones. They usually publish wire-service reports.

    Why use Mexico as an example? I presume it's the author's whim and you'll have to ask him.
     

    Fabulist

    Banned
    American English
    More context might explain why Mexican newspapers were mentioned. Was the narrator in Mexico? If so, he would have been explaining why he knew of the incident. Apparently, he knows somehow that it was reported in Mexican newspapers. Perhaps he is saying that it was such a notorious incident that even Mexican newspapers reported it, even though it did not occur in Mexico or involve a Mexican. This would be an especially telling point if Mexican newspapers rarely report foreign events. It might suggest that the incident was more notorious than if it had been reported in, say, "the Canadian papers."
     
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