It makes a nice change

The Prof

Senior Member
We often use this expression when talking about something pleasant that we don´t often do:

-It was great to go off in the caravan last week; it made a nice change.

-It makes a nice change to see a film that isn't full of sex and violence!

-Let's meet for lunch at the tapas bar instead of the pizza restaurant; it will make a nice change.

When I tried to think of a way of saying it in French, I didn't get beyond 'c'est (c'était / ce sera) très agréable' , but I'm not happy with that because it lacks the sense of 'change'.

I'd be really grateful for any suggestions. :)
 
  • BluSluRpy

    New Member
    Canada - Quebec -Bilingual
    Colloquially French speakers will often say "Ça fait changement" "Ça a fait changement".
    "C'est agréable d'avoir changé la routine" could be a possible way of rendering "it made a nice change"
     

    Kecha

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    Colloquially French speakers will often say "Ça fait changement" "Ça a fait changement".
    "C'est agréable d'avoir changé la routine" could be a possible way of rendering "it made a nice change"
    Must be a Quebec thing, never heard that in France...

    However we would say "ça change" or "ça change de d'habitude" or "ça change un peu".
    Sometimes "[sentence], pour changer !" but that's mostly used with irony, and means you actually did what you always do.
     
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