it never rains but it pours

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Włoskipolak 72

Senior Member
Polish
People say it never rains but it pours to mean that when one bad thing happens, other bad things often happen too and make the situation worse..

'' It was an interesting year — Danny lost his job, I was off sick for three months and Josh broke his leg. It never rains but it pours, as they say! ''

How do you say it in your language ??
Thanks :oops:

In Polish it should be : "nieszczęścia chodzą parami”, literally "misfortunes come in pairs."
 
  • Włoskipolak 72

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Piove sul bagnato (?)
    Very interesting question ..!?

    Piove sul bagnato ( Nel linguaggio comune l’espressione viene utilizzata per indicare che gli eventi spiacevoli o, al contrario, quelli piacevoli, capitano a chi ne sta già vivendo in abbondanza). In common parlance, the expression is used to indicate that unpleasant events or, conversely, pleasant ones, happen to those who are already experiencing them in abundance.

    I'm not 100% sure in Polish : Piove sul bagnato =
    Biednemu wiatr zawsze z oczy wieje a bogatemu to się i byk ocieli..!?


    Questa espressione trae origine da Giovanni Pascoli che nelle sue Prose scrive "Piove sul bagnato: lagrime su sangue, sangue su lagrime".
    L'espressione in seguito ha avuto molto successo ed è rimasta nella lingua comune ad indicare che le disgrazie spesso non vengono mai sole o così appare a chi soffre e crede di essere tormentato dalla sfortuna.
    L'espressione vale anche nel senso opposto quando vuole significare che ai già favoriti dalla fortuna capita ancora qualcosa di positivo ..!??


    In inglese un'espressione dal significato simile è When it rains, it pours (Quando piove, diluvia).

    Piove sul bagnato - Wikipedia
     

    alfaalfa

    Senior Member
    italiano
    Ciao,
    Piove sul bagnato ( Nel linguaggio comune l’espressione viene utilizzata per indicare che gli eventi spiacevoli :tick: o, al contrario, quelli piacevoli:cross:, capitano a chi ne sta già vivendo in abbondanza)



    L'espressione vale anche nel senso opposto quando vuole significare che ai già favoriti dalla fortuna capita ancora qualcosa di positivo ..!??
    Qui diremmo, ad esempio, "l'acqua va al mare".
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    In Portuguese:

    Uma desgraça nunca vem sozinha (a misfortune never comes alone).
    A desgraça vem a cavalo (misfortunes come on the back of a horse).
    Desgraça pouca é bobagem (a little bit of misfortune isn't worth it).
     
    In Greek we use an Ancient Greek proverb, rendered into the modern language:
    «Ἑνός ἀτόπου δοθέντος μύρια ἔπονται» ĕnós ătópou dŏtʰéntŏs múriă épŏntai̯ (Ancient Gr)

    «Ενός κακού μύρια έπονται» [eˈnɔs kaˈku ˈmi.rʲa ˈe.pɔn.de] (MoGr) --> one misfortune is followed by ten thousand misfortunes
     

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    Macedonian:

    несреќата никогаш не доаѓа сама (nesréḱata níkogaš ne dóaǵa sáma) lit. "the-misfortune never comes singly"

    "Macedonian-English Dictionary of Idioms", Zoze Murgoski
     
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    Sobakus

    Senior Member
    Some of this is from a somewhat antiquated book on proverbs - let the natives chime in.

    Russian:
    Беда́ не прихо́дит одна́ "trouble doesn't come alone".​
    Беда́ беду́ роди́т (а тре́тья и сама́ прибежи́т) "trouble birthes another trouble (and the third one will come running by itself)".​
    Пойдёт беда́, отворя́й ворота́ "if trouble comes along, open the gates".​
    ...and countless other variations.​

    Latin:
    Aliud ex aliō malum "one trouble after another" (Terence, 2c. BC).​
    Fortūna obesse nūllī contenta est semel “Fortune is never satisfied with hurting a man just once” (Publius Syrus, 1c. AD)​
    Nūlla calamitās sōla “no misfortune is alone” (unknown, probably medieval).​
    Dolor dolōrem trūdit et metus metum "one grief presses hard on another, and one fear on another fear" (unknown, probably medieval)​
    Aliō relinquente flūctū alius excēpit "while one wave was letting <me> go, another one caught up with me" (Erasmus, 15c., translating a fragment of speech by Aristides (5-4c. BC) and treating it as a standalone proverb).​
    Ancient Greek, also from Erasmus, who says that Aristides' phrase was an alteration of an earlier proverb, which he cites thusly:
    Σὸ μέν μ’ ἔλιπε κῦμα, τὸ δ’ ἐγκατελάμβανεν, translating it as haec mē relīquit unda, at illa corripit "this wave has let me go, yet that one is snatching me up" (I don't know Greek myself).​
    Ἐπὶ δ'ἄλγεσι ἄλγεα κεῖται "grief lies upon grief" (Euripides, 3c. BC).​
    Ἕτερα δ'ἀφ'ἑτέρων κακὰ κακῶν κυρεῖ "one after another, trouble after trouble befall me" (also Euripides).​

    Italian:
    Un malanno non vien mai solo "misfortune never comes alone".​
    Una disgrazia tira l'altra "one bad luck drags along another".​

    French:
    Un malheur ne vient jamais seul "misfortune never comes alone".​
    Un malheur amène son frère "misfortune brings along its brother".​

    Spanish:
    Las desgracias nunca vienen solas "misfortunes never come alone".​
    Anda, malo, tras tu hermano "come, trouble, in the wake of your brother".​
    Bien vengas mal, si vienes solo "it's a good ill that comes alone".​

    German:
    Ein Unglück kommt selten allein "misfortune never comes alone".​
    Ein Unglück kommt dem ändern auf die Fersen "one misfortune comes on the heel of another".​

    English:
    One misfortune comes on the neck of another.
     
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