it or some

navi

Banned
armenian
A-Would you like some sugar with your tea?
1-I'd like some.
2-I'd like it.

B-Would you like sugar with your tea?
3-I'd like some.
4-I'd like it.



Sentences 1 and 2 are supposed to be replies to question A and sentences 3 and 4 are supposed to be replies to question B.
Which of the sentences 1, 2, 3 and 4 are correct?
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Whether correct or not, you would never hear 1-4.
    Indeed, you would never hear A or B either.
    The question is:
    Do you take sugar?
    or
    Sugar?
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I agree with MC. You would not say "I'd like it"; "I'd like some" is OK but unnecessary.

    The normal answer would be "Yes, please". "Please" is the important word here, and I note it is not in any of your examples. Saying please is expected in accepting something offered, and you should always use it. In fact saying the word "Please" alone would be a perfectly acceptable answer. However, certainly in the UK, you would be expected to say how many sugars: "Two, please".

    By the way, there would be no difference in the answers given in A and B.
     

    tom_in_bahia

    Senior Member
    South Florida/Phoenix-Tucson/the Adirondacks. Native of North American English
    As English speakers, we tend to not repeat the complete answer in long form. We would more often say: "Yes, please," "Yes, I would," or some other affirmative remark or grunt.

    If we were to say such a long answer (including a verb with object - in this case some or it), we'd probably stress the would for some emphatic purpose.

    Also, because sugar is not a countable known (i.e., you need to use another word to literally count it, we tend to use "some" to partition the sugar (or whatever other non-count noun, like liquids or grains).

    *If you were to count sugar, you'd probably be refering the vessel or container in which the sugar is being stored: Please pass me the sugar (shaker). I'm making a cake, so I need to go to the store and get (a pound of) sugar. In these two examples, the quantity of sugar would be understood by the physical context and situation. So, by that rationale, the second question you have would be refering to the sugar tin that is holding the sugar.
     

    Brave1

    Member
    Spanish, United States
    If I was reading this in an English text book and had to choose the correct answers I'd choose 1 and 3 but as it's been noted before, there are far more common ways of answering the question depending on the country of origin.I think when someone asks "how many sugars?" they are referring to sugar cubes but where I live cubes of sugar are not commonly found in homes or restaurants.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    [...]I think when someone asks "how many sugars?" they are referring to sugar cubes but where I live cubes of sugar are not commonly found in homes or restaurants.
    Not necessarily, and I'll explain in a moment.

    In a restaurant, this question would not normally arise: sugar, in some form or other, would be on the table.

    The context for asking this question is where someone is going to bring you a cup of tea and you will not be able to add sugar yourself. The question, "How many sugars?" refers either to sugar lumps or to spoonfuls of sugar.
     

    Judica

    Senior Member
    AE (US), Spanish (LatAm)
    A-Would you like some sugar with your tea?
    1-I'd like some.
    2-I'd like it.

    B-Would you like sugar with your tea?
    3-I'd like some.
    4-I'd like it.



    Sentences 1 and 2 are supposed to be replies to question A and sentences 3 and 4 are supposed to be replies to question B.
    Which of the sentences 1, 2, 3 and 4 are correct?

    In my opinion, 1 and 3 are correct.
     
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