it 'precedes' a coast...

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mj0621

New Member
korean-korea
Hello,
I don't understand what below sentences means, especially 'precedes'.

The harbour has also become a symbol.
It precedes a coast beaten by the waves with imposing rocks.

Why is the word 'precedes' used here and what does it mean exactly?
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Where does this come from? It doesn't quite sound like a native speaker's writing. A harbour is on a coast, of course, but 'precede' is a strange way of saying this. Also, the order of ideas in 'beaten by the waves with imposing rocks' is strange.
     

    mj0621

    New Member
    korean-korea
    Where does this come from? It doesn't quite sound like a native speaker's writing. A harbour is on a coast, of course, but 'precede' is a strange way of saying this. Also, the order of ideas in 'beaten by the waves with imposing rocks' is strange.
    It is from a documentary program. I also think it is a very strange sentence that's why I couldn't imagine what it means. So based on your aswer I can think that it means the harbor is on the coast. Thank you very much.
     

    mj0621

    New Member
    korean-korea
    It would make sense, perhaps, if the documentary is describing the area as one approaches it from the sea.o_O
    So can it mean that the harbor is in front of coast(?) and the second sentence describes the wave and rocks on that coast?
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    So can it mean that the harbor is in front of coast(?) and the second sentence describes the wave and rocks on that coast?
    A harbour is generally a protected area of water and is likely to be in an inward projection of the coastline (in a sort of bay). I find it difficult to imagine how a harbour could precede (be in front of) the coast.

    Yes, the second sentence describes the waves beating on the coast and rocks on the coast.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    The harbour has also become a symbol. It precedes a coast beaten by the waves with imposing rocks.
    Is this from the documentary "Coast"?

    In any case, it seems that the description is given by a person who is on land and, for example, north of the harbour and to the west of the sea. In front of him, he has the harbour, and beyond (to the south of) the harbour, there is a coast that is "beaten by the waves with imposing rocks." <- which is ambiguous and probably should be "a coast with imposing rocks that are beaten by the sea."
     

    mj0621

    New Member
    korean-korea
    A harbour is generally a protected area of water and is likely to be in an inward projection of the coastline (in a sort of bay). I find it difficult to imagine how a harbour could precede (be in front of) the coast.

    Yes, the second sentence describes the waves beating on the coast and rocks on the coast.
    I also didn't see why 'precede' was used and wanted to know the exact meaning. Thank you for your explanation.
     

    mj0621

    New Member
    korean-korea
    Is this from the documentary "Coast"?

    In any case, it seems that the description is given by a person who is on land and, for example, north of the harbour and to the west of the sea. In front of him, he has the harbour, and beyond (to the south of) the harbour, there is a coast that is "beaten by the waves with imposing rocks." <- which is ambiguous and probably should be "a coast with imposing rocks that are beaten by the sea."
    It is a documentary about the islands near the atlantic ocean.
    The screen shows the harbor from the land and then closes up to the waves. Your explanation fits with the scene so I got the idea what the writer is trying to say. Thank you for your detailed explanation.
     
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