it self / it's self / itself

Mango4u

New Member
Dutch
Which of the following phrases is correct?

Sometimes my pc turns on by it self.

Sometimes my pc turns on by it's self.

Sometimes my pc turns on by itself.

I can find them all when I type it in google.

Thanks in advance!

Mango
 
  • Forero

    Senior Member
    USA English
    The phrase is correctly written "by itself". "It's self" is also a valid phrase, where "self" is the noun used in philosophy, psychology, etc., but that does not fit here.
     

    IParleFrench

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Sorry to disagree, Forero, but I would have trouble thinking of any time "it's self" would be used. "It's" can only mean "it is." The possessive version of "it" is "its."
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Sorry to disagree, Forero, but I would have trouble thinking of any time "it's self" would be used. "It's" can only mean "it is." The possessive version of "it" is "its."
    Thank you, IParleFrench. I was imagining I saw "its self". But perhaps I can redeem my post with another dose of imagination:

    A: "The whatever-you-call-it's purpose is to imagine that it is real. Is it ego, or id?" [The possessive of whatever-you-call-it is formed regularly, by adding -'s.]
    B: "It's self." [= It is self.]
    C: "I think it's got to be either ego or id." ["it's" = "it has".]

    (Far fetched, I know.)


    To summarize:
    • The possessive adjective (and little-used possessive pronoun) its has no apostrophe.
    • The reflexive or emphatic pronoun itself is one word, no apostrophe, only one s.
    • It's is usually a contraction of either it is or it has, but it can also occur at the end of possessive such as whatever-you-call-it's.
    • There are no its in this sentence, only an "its". The plural of it (note the italics) is its.
    • Natives like me are not immune to typographical, and other, errors.
    • Google does not distinguish proof-read text from error-filled text.
    I hope this helps.
     

    s2Roy

    New Member
    English
    Thank you, IParleFrench. I was imagining I saw "its self". But perhaps I can redeem my post with another dose of imagination:

    A: "The whatever-you-call-it's purpose is to imagine that it is real. Is it ego, or id?" [The possessive of whatever-you-call-it is formed regularly, by adding -'s.]
    B: "It's self." [= It is self.]
    C: "I think it's got to be either ego or id." ["it's" = "it has".]

    (Far fetched, I know.)


    To summarize:
    • The possessive adjective (and little-used possessive pronoun) its has no apostrophe.
    • The reflexive or emphatic pronoun itself is one word, no apostrophe, only one s.
    • It's is usually a contraction of either it is or it has, but it can also occur at the end of possessive such as whatever-you-call-it's.
    • There are no its in this sentence, only an "its". The plural of it (note the italics) is its.
    • Natives like me are not immune to typographical, and other, errors.
    • Google does not distinguish proof-read text from error-filled text.
    I hope this helps.
    Sorry to disagree, Forero, but I would have trouble thinking of any time "it's self" would be used. "It's" can only mean "it is." The possessive version of "it" is "its."
    For Forero, I'm confused here what the "A,B,C" answers are meaning, maybe not the "B" one though. Also "C" the "I think it's got to" the "got" is redundant here, saying "It has got to be". Not a horrible error but I always tell people, try to avoid using "got" as much as possible and easily replaced 95% of the time.
    Another one for "C", also unaware what he is writing for or how formal he/she needs to be. Again not horrible but the contraction "it's" should only be used for "it is" "it has" is incorrect, I could be wrong but again, not a huge deal if people understand what's being said.
    Same for "whatever-you-call-it", not an actual defined term/word in the diconary so technically if someone were going for "correct" grammar, I would advise leaving out the slang. Haha ;P

    IParleFrench while correct as previously stated, there is a contradiction here I hope others will conjure more examples.
    While yes, sentence "C" would be incorrect to use "it's self" here. Still possible to use this syntax for proper grammar though.
    Example: "It's/It is self aware of our presences" which my head instantly goes to A.I. taking over the world haha!
    Besides simple little changes, also having a hard time thinking of more.
    [Edited to remove 'chatspeak' DonnyB - moderator]
     
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