It sore or it sores?

teacherdehnavi

Senior Member
Persian
Hi. I watched a short clip and a girl was bitten by a bull ant and she said it's really sore which sound like passive form but I do know if the past participle of sore is sore. Please shed some light. I also want to know how to use sore in present tense. I googled the word and I didn't see third person singular s at the end of sore.
 
  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    It is sore. (It currently hurts.)
    It was sore. (I hurt in the past.)

    Addendum: I did not know what a bull ant was.

    “The venom from Myrmecia stings are among the most potent in the insect world,” Dr Yeates said. “Some people can suffer anaphylactic reactions if they’re particularly sensitive to the sting, and bull ants have been responsible for human deaths in the past.”


    Things that sting: how do Aussie insects measure up on the pain scale? - CSIROscope
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    she said it's really sore which sound like passive form but I do know if the past participle of sore is sore
    The past participle of "to sore" is "sored", but the word "sore" is almost never used as a verb.
    This is not a passive form, but a simple linking sentence with "is" being the verb, and "sore" being an adjective. "It is sore" = "it is painful" = "it hurts". We do not say "it sores" for this.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The past participle of "to sore" is "sored", but the word "sore" is almost never used as a verb.
    This is not a passive form, but a simple linking sentence with "is" being the verb, and "sore" being an adjective. "It is sore" = "it is painful" = "it hurts". We do not say "it sores" for this.
    I Googled "sore" conjugation and I was amazed that one existed. I had no idea that it was ever used as a verb. Having read over the entire conjugation I can say with some certainty that I have never heard any of those verb forms used in American English.

    "I am soring..." (How would anyone ever use that? My spell checker objects too.)

    Conjugation of the English verb sore - Conjugate sore in English

    Conjugation of the English verb sore
     

    Orble

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    This bull ant head puts the fear of God into me! We call the smaller ones “Jack jumpers” in Tasmania and they hurt a great deal and for days afterwards. I am only mildly allergic and develop a big hard itchy lump at the site of the sting.
     

    Orble

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    “It is really sore!” (Meaning it really hurts) is perfectly correct in my Australian usage.
    But “it sores” is not possible.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    "I am soring..." (How would anyone ever use that? My spell checker objects too.)
    You would use it in the sense of "I am wounding (someone one something)".
    OED said:
    a. trans. To make sore, in various senses; to give (physical or mental) pain to; †to wound.
    1847 H. Bushnell Christian Nurture (1861) iii. 46 Religion itself, pressed down upon them till they are fatally sored by its impossible claims, becomes [etc.].
    1894 Harper's Mag. Feb. 356/1 Some..are on foot, from soring their horses' backs.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    You would use it in the sense of "I am wounding (someone one something)".
    I understand that. I understood that. But then I tried to imagine a sentence and the ones I came up with all sounded too weird to be used.

    I sored him badly with my punch.

    I was soring her when I was interrupted.

    They sored me because of my religious beliefs.

    Really? That sounds like English to anyone? It does not to my spell checker which objected to all uses of "sore" as a verb.
     

    Orble

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Very interesting, Edinburgher. I have never heard or read “sore” used in this way. It reminds me of other words where the verb form has been forgotten while the adjective persists.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    If I heard that I would think you were flying her like a kite!:D

    Yes, I know "soar" is intransitive.
    Yeah, with bad spelling. I thought the same.

    He went soaring on his hang glider but the harness sored him and soured him on the sport.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Very interesting, Edinburgher. I have never heard or read “sore” used in this way. It reminds me of other words where the verb form has been forgotten while the adjective persists.
    In this case, the verb derives from the adjective, so the past participle has to be sored. Sore was an adverb and an adjective long before it was ever used as a verb.

    I"d say "It pains me", or even "It ouches", before trying to get away with "It sores me." (And sore does sound just like soar.)
     

    Orble

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    In this case, the verb derives from the adjective, so the past participle has to be sored. Sore was an adverb and an adjective long before it was ever used as a verb.

    I"d say "It pains me", or even "It ouches", before trying to get away with "It sores me." (And sore does sound just like soar.)
    Okay, makes sense.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Nobody uses the verb 'to sore', not ever. I'm astonished there is one.

    'Sore' is used as an adjective after a linking verb like 'to be' or 'to seem'.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    I agree that "to sore" is among those words (here, a verb) that, although found in a dictionary, are never used (in modern language). The girl said "It's really sore."; "sore" is an adjective. The sentence isn't passive.
     
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