It stormed last night

  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    We don’t normally say it stormed in the same way as we say it rained or it snowed. It would be better to say that there was a storm.

    EDIT: But apparently this is only true of British English! :):)
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    I don't recall hearing 'it stormed' in the US. Since PaulQ says it's American, maybe it's a regional use of the verb and not universally AmE.
    I'd say "there was a storm."
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I wonder where the OP got that phrase from. "It stormed" (or rather its equivalent) is unremarkable in German, but I've never heard it in any variety of English.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I'm pretty sure I've heard it. I'll look for examples.

    From COCA:

    - My mind went back to that night when it stormed and she had kissed me.

    - It stormed all last night, and I'm at work at 8am on a Saturday...

    - and sometimes, when it stormed, we put on rain gear...

    - Some days it stormed when we were out there, and there was distant lightning, then wind...

    Those all sound like normal uses based on my experience – especially the second one.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Is ''It stormed last night and the storm broke many trees'' correct, please?
    The first part is fine with me but I would not say "broke". I would say something like "toppled many trees and brought down many limbs and branches". (That's what happens to the trees we have here during big storms.)
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    The first part is fine with me but I would not say "broke". I would say something like "toppled many trees and brought down many limbs and branches". (That's what happens to the trees we have here during big storms.)

    The first part isn't something I'd say but I agree that we don't say "to break" about trees.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I'm pretty sure I've heard it. I'll look for examples.

    From COCA:

    2 It stormed all last night, and I'm at work at 8am on a Saturday...
    I'm pleased about that. The OED entry
    To storm: 1 b. impersonal. To blow violently; also to rain, snow, etc. heavily. Now only U.S.
    1894 Chambers's Jrnl. 16 June 376/1 Oh, but the nuts fall much more quickly when it storms.
    has not been amended for 130 years, but MW has
    storm verb stormed; storming; storms

    intransitive verb
    1a : to blow with violence
    b : to rain, hail, snow, or sleet vigorously.
    without comment (or example).
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    American English (New England and NYC)
    And of the three Americans on here, two have never heard it. So it's apparently not universally used in the US.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I would say my language heartland is the Midwest, although I don't live there now and haven't for many years.

    But I would say it's absolutely everyday usage to me. Once I looked up the examples I realized my initial hesitancy was unfounded. I've heard that use my whole life.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "It stormed hard last night so I couldn't get the passenger side 'catch can' on."

    This was written in a forum by a user registered in Derby, Kansas.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I don't think I'd use "stormed" in that context. That's too big. Stormed is used for more local events - basically lightning and thunder and high winds that move through an area intensely for a few hours or a day.
    Given that many haven't even heard of/used storm as a verb, it's not surprising that your personal use is restricted in that way - mine wouldn't be. But that's typical of many English words with variations in local usage and nuances. Many learners come to the study of the language thinking such things are uniform throughout (or only used in) AE or throughout (or only used in) BE, for example.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I would definitely draw a distinction between a named storm that you could track for days and the verb "stormed". When you're in the middle of a hurricane it's not "storming". Storming where I live is when you wake up in the night and hear the rain pounding down and thunder and lightning. It might be gone by morning. That's the weather we are having right now. Tornados killed two people yesterday and we've had periods of heavy rain off and on since. It won't be written up in Wikipedia, though. It's just everyday weather.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    I have certainly heard "stormed" in the sense that Kentix mentions.

    It is also common to hear things like "He got upset and stormed off". Same verb, slightly different sense.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Same verb, slightly different sense.
    A: What's all that noise out there?
    B: Oh, it's just a bit of storming. Nothing to worry about.

    The above conversation between two Frenchmen was overheard by a fly on the wall of the Bastille on 14th July 1789.
     
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