it takes the biscuit

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agliagli

Senior Member
French
Hi again:

Could someone explain the meaning of this expression? Is it currently used, and if not, could you please tell me in what area(s) of English speaking country is it more prone (^_^) to be found?

Thank you in advance.
 
  • LV4-26

    Senior Member
    it takes the biscuit = it surpasses everything, it's the ultimate limit.
    Seems to be more often used with a negative sense, i.e. it's worse than anything else.

    Have a look here.

    It's British English. (by the way, would Americans say "it takes the cookie"? :p)
     

    agliagli

    Senior Member
    French
    I'm sorry Yannawiled, I'm afraid I did not get your point... (I'm a bit dumb with subtilties in English...would you please make your message more clear?)

    Anyway, thank you to LV4-26 for your answer. ^_^

    Editing: Oh! I see... I was just an off-topic remark. :-/
     

    savannah

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    It's British English. (by the way, would Americans say "it takes the cookie"? :p)
    Ahh... Now you've explained it, I get it. In the US, we'd say "That takes the cake" and it would be used in precisely the same situations.
     

    cheshire

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    it takes the biscuit = it surpasses everything, it's the ultimate limit.
    Seems to be more often used with a negative sense, i.e. it's worse than anything else.

    Have a look here.

    It's British English. (by the way, would Americans say "it takes the cookie"? :p)
    Is the idiom ever used with a positive sense?
    If I were to say, "Your abilility to explain clearly for everything we ask takes the biscuit." would it offend you, because the idiom is usually used with a negative sense?
     
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