"It/That/This" vs "Which" vs "Such" vs appositive clause

huynhvantinhftu

Senior Member
Vietnamese
I have the original sentence:
(1) In some societies, the difference between men and women is very simple: it is that men earn money, and women spend money.
I tried to rewrite in three ways:
(2) In some societies, the difference between men and women is very simple. It/That/This is that men earn money and women spend money.
(3) In some societies, the difference between men and women is a very simple one, that is, that men earn money and women spend it.
(4) In some societies, the difference between men and women is very simple, which is that men earn money and women spend money.
(5) In some societies, the difference between men and women is very simple and such is that men earn money and women spend money.

In the sentence (2), "It/That/This" refers back to "the difference"

In the sentence (3), "that is" = namely is used to introduce the next noun clause as an appositive (that men earn money and women spend it) modifying "a very simple one".

In the sentence (4), "Which" refers back to the whole sentence preceding (the difference between men and women is very simple)

In the sentence (5), "such" refers back to the whole sentence preceding (the difference between men and women is very simple)



I wonder if the sentences (2) (3) (4) and (5) are correct and my observations are correct?
I hope to receive your advice.
Many thanks in advance.
 
Last edited:
  • SevenDays

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    In (1), you need "it," which refers back to what was previously mentioned ("the difference.") This is called anaphora. I wouldn't use that and this. When involved in "anaphora," that and this usually refer to "propositions" rather than simple noun phrases. For example:
    In some societies, the difference between men and women is very simply; it is that men earn money, and women spend money. That is all you need to know.

    I agree with you with respect to (2) and (3). In (2), I see that the idiom "that is" is short of "that is to say."
     

    huynhvantinhftu

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    In (1), you need "it," which refers back to what was previously mentioned ("the difference.") This is called anaphora. I wouldn't use that and this. When involved in "anaphora," that and this usually refer to "propositions" rather than simple noun phrases. For example:
    In some societies, the difference between men and women is very simply; it is that men earn money, and women spend money. That is all you need to know.

    I agree with you with respect to (2) and (3). In (2), I see that the idiom "that is" is short of "that is to say."
    Sorry for the inconvenience, because I changed the number and I added a new way - the sentence (5)
     

    SevenDays

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    I forgot to say that (4) is also correct. As far as (5) is concerned, I think it is needlessly complicated, which means that I'm not sure it'll be universally accepted. To me, it doesn't work, but it may work for others.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)

    huynhvantinhftu

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    I use "Such" with the meaning based on this sentence:

    (6) I may have hurt her feelings but such was not my intention. ("such" refers back to "I have may hurt her feelings")
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    (6) I may have hurt her feelings but such was not my intention. ("such" refers back to "I have may hurt her feelings")
    (6) I may have hurt her feelings but I may have hurt her feelings was not my intention. :thumbsdown:
    (6) I may have hurt her feelings but hurting her feelings was not my intention. :thumbsup: "such" only refers to "hurt her feelings."
    There's nothing that "such" can clearly refer to in your sentence.
     

    huynhvantinhftu

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    (6) I may have hurt her feelings but I may have hurt her feelings was not my intention. :thumbsdown:
    (6) I may have hurt her feelings but hurting her feelings was not my intention. :thumbsup: "such" only refers to "hurt her feelings."
    There's nothing that "such" can clearly refer to in your sentence.
    I see the problem now.
    According to your comment, Can I say:
    (7) In some societies, there is a very simple difference between men and women and such is that men earn money and women spend money. ("such" refers back to "a very simple difference between men and women")
    (8) In some societies, there is a very simple difference between men and women, such as, that men earn money and women spend money. ("such as" introduces a noun clause acting as appositive - "that men earn money and women spend money")
     
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