It was a doom, <that was>

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(page 414, chapter 18) by DH Lawrence (planetebook,here):
(background: Connie said Mellors didn’t really love her wife Bertha, and he did her that wrong. Mellors said he didn't do her wrong and he began to love her. Mellors continued..…)

‘ …… It was a doom, that was. And she was a doomed woman.This last time, I’d have shot her like I shoot a stoat, if I’d but been allowed: a raving, doomed thing in the shape of a woman! If only I could have shot her, and ended the whole misery!……

I understand it was a doom to be it was my fate, and that was to be that was my fate(Mellors emphasized the meaning through repeating)

Am I right please?
Thank you in advance
 
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  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I mostly agree. Here Mellor is saying that he isn't responsible for not loving her, because it was fate. I don't think he's focusing on 'not loving' as his fate, but rather he thinks it was Bertha's fate not to be loved and that he was compelled to fulfill this fate.
     

    Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    That's not how I would understand this. "It was a doom" to me means "that is a condemnation to destruction", rather than simply the character's fate/destiny. And "that was" isn't quite how you describe it. Yes, it's repetition for emphasis, but it's also a very common part of speech in parts of England. "That was a great meal, that was", "That was a lovely cup of tea, that was".
     

    exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    That's not how I would understand this. "It was a doom" to me means "that is a condemnation to destruction", rather than simply the character's fate/destiny. .
    Tha depends on whether you think that the words are Mellors' (who would use the present-day meaning condemnation), or Lawrence's (who would use the literary meaning fate).

    See the WRF dictionary entry for doom
    1. fate or destiny, esp. bad or adverse fate.
    2. ruin or death:
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you three. Now I know the understanding of this sentence is controversial.

    Please notice the subsequent sentence:This last time, I’d have shot her like I shoot a stoat, if I’d but been allowed: a raving, doomed thing in the shape of a woman!
     
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