it was a shadow of himself; and yet behold the image of the dead dealer

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mariana79

Senior Member
Turkish
Hello
In Mr. Stevenson's Markheim (a short story) Markheim has committed a murder and now (like Macbeth) is seeing things. He starts seeing this faceless creature who has eyes. My problem is the last part of the sentence:

Ay, surely; to every room and corner of the house his imagination followed it; and now it was a faceless thing, and yet had eyes to see with; and again
it was a shadow of himself; and yet behold the image of the dead dealer, reinspired with cunning and hatred.

I do not understand the link of the red part with the rest:
this creature was a shadow of himself and yet ....?
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    You’ve missed out a word. It reads: and yet again behold the image…

    That’s the third of the three hallucinations he’s describing – the monster has taken the form, in his imagination, of the dead dealer reinspired (= with new life breathed into him).
     
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