it was done from a photograph

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omarow

Senior Member
Turkiye - Turkish
Hello everyone,

I'll directly quote the sentences from Sins and Needles by Karina Halle for the sake of context: "My eyes were immediately drawn to a painting of a woman above the driftwood table. It looked like Picasso’s Woman in Blue, except that it was done from a photograph."

My question is: what does "it was done from a photograph" mean? Does it mean that the painting was done by mimicking a photograph or the painting was in the form of a photograph?
 
  • Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    Instead of having a live model sit for him while he painted the portrait, the artist had painted it while looking at a photograph.

    I'm not sure how this would make it different from Picasso's painting. I don't think that looking at his "Woman in Blue" we could tell that it was not painted from a photograph. This sentence seems like a non sequitur to me.
     
    Last edited:

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Yes, the basic distinction is between 'done from life' (with a model in front of the artist) and done from another image: a photograph, or an engraving done from a painting, for example. But how does the narrator know? What does it look like? I understood it as a painting of another woman in a similar pose and perhaps with a similar background and similar colour scheme to Woman in Blue - not actually a copy of Picasso's painting, but inspired by it. 'Looked like . . . except that' makes it sound as if it's not close enough to the original: similar, but not a copy. But in this case, how can you look at it and see whether it was copied/done from a photo of this other woman, or using this other woman as a live model?
     

    omarow

    Senior Member
    Turkiye - Turkish
    Thank you Sparky Malarky and entangledbank for your answers. It's clear now.

    But I really don't know how the writer figured it out. Maybe the one who painted it is someone who wouldn't bother with live models. Who knows?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    It is known that Picasso's "Woman in Blue" was painted from memory. He was in Spain, painting pictures of Parisienne women. This woman may be entirely imaginary.
    Reine Sofia Museum on "Woman in Blue"
    In his memoirs, the great novelist Pío Baroja masterfully recreated the atmosphere and the era in which the painter was doing this kind of female portrait: “When he was in Madrid, Pablo Picasso had taken a studio near the Calle Zurbano, where he spent his time painting women from memory with a certain Parisian air, and round, rosebud mouths.
     
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