It was like a ride running turgid upward, and spreading on the sky(Lawrence)

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longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(para. 129) by Lawrence(the University of Adelaide,here):

She went to the wood next day. It was a grey, still afternoon, with the dark-green dogs-mercury spreading under the hazel copse, and all the trees making a silent effort to open their buds. Today she could almost feel it in her own body, the huge heave of the sap in the massive trees, upwards, up, up to the bud-tips, there to push into little flamey oak-leaves, bronze as blood. It was like a ride running turgid upward, and spreading on the sky.


I guess "ride" refers to "horse". But What does "it" refer to? It seems to be "leaves", because only leaves can spread on the sky.

Could you please give me some explanations?
Thank you in advance

Sorry, wrong link corrected.
 
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  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I think it's probably this sort of "ride" (the Collins definition #2 in WR dictionary):

    "a path specially made for riding on horseback"

    or maybe it's referring to a fairground ride. It isn't really clear to me.

    I think "it" is the "heave of the sap".
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    You can also get a ride in a car, but of course a definition has to fit the context. I don't think the idea is that the sap is like a horse ride.:confused:

    (Edit: The link you have given doesn't seem to lead to the correct chapter.)
     

    qusiemargo

    Senior Member
    English, US
    I think the textual reference is imperfect and goes back to the verb "feel" "she could almost feel ... " and "it" refers then to "the feeling".
    What is happening in the trees is a metaphore for her body and how she feels. Anything we read about the trees we should apply to her own sensations.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you.
    I tend to agree with Velisarius. Because the sap flow is like a horse path, and the sap can result the leaves to spread( luxuriant) on the sky.
    But I feel "on the sky" a little strange. I think it should be "in the sky"
     

    qusiemargo

    Senior Member
    English, US
    "the heave of the sap" is antecedent, therefore "it", if it refers to "the heave of the sap", remains a case of anaphora.
    A case of "cataphora" would make "it" refer to "ride", which seems unlikely in this case of a simile.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    It's like a painting - the sap (envisioned by Lawrence as a ride) is spread over/across/on the sky as on a canvas.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    ...could almost feel it in her own body, the huge heave of the sap
    The cataphor is here, and "it" is repeated further on in "It was like a ride"
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    "Ride" looks like a misprint to me - this version has "tide", which makes a lot more sense:).



    (I agree that "it" = "the huge heave of the sap".)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Thanks Loob, it certainly does make more sense. I'm so glad I qualified my post #2, saying it wasn't clear to me. Otherwise I'd be feeling foolish (more foolish):D.

    Edit: I did check with another online-available edition of this work, and it also had "ride". (Collectors Library edition). I didn't check my own copy, because I was too lazy.
     
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    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Oh, my God. We wasted so long a time on the eror. So now I feel the tide makes the leaves luxuriant (like "spread") on the sky.

    Is that right?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    No, it's the "huge heave of the sap" which is like a tide, longxianchen;).
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    I know it's the "huge heave of the sap" that makes the leaves luxuriant like "spread" on the sky.
    Thank you so much.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    No, sorry, the idea isn't that the leaves were luxuriant against the sky*. The idea is that Connie could almost feel the sap rising.



    *EDIT: the leaves weren't luxuriant:)
     
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