It was not without a certain wild pleasure I ran before the wind,delivering my trouble of mind

Irelia20150604

Senior Member
Chinese
The quotation comes from Jane Eyre Chapter 25

Quotation: It was not without a certain wild pleasure I ran before the wind,delivering my trouble of mind to the measureless air-torrent thundering through space. Descending the laurel walk, I faced the wreck of the chestnut-tree; it stood up black and riven: the trunk, split down the centre, gasped ghastly.

Context: It is the chestnut that had seen Mr. Rochester swear love to Jane. It was “struck by lightning in the night, and half of it split away” the same night.
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Hi everyone! I don’t quite understand the bold part. The problems are the sentence structure and the word “delivering”. I try to interpret it as below. Is it correct?

To deliver => 4.I.4 To disburden, unload. ? Obs.
5.I.5 refl. To disburden oneself of what is in one's mind; to express one's opinion or thought; to utter words or sounds; to speak, discourse. (Cf. 10.)

before => as in my thread with ceaseless rain sweeping away wildly before a long and lamentable blast
Yes, when you have a strong wind at your back you can feel it pushing or sweeping you forward. It doesn't necessarily make me think of ships. If the wind is behind you, you are going "before" it. The rain is falling down, and simultaneously it's being swept in a certain direction by the wind. The direction it's going is "the front" and the wind is "behind" the rain, if you like.
The sentence structure => It was not without (=with) a certain wild (that) I ran before the wind, disburdening myself of my trouble of mind to…
 
  • Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    ... The sentence structure => It was not without (=with) a certain wild <pleasure> (that) I ran before the wind, disburdening myself of my trouble of mind to…
    I think you've misssed out a word, Irelia - but yes, you've got the idea:thumbsup:.
     
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