It was off the beaten track.

  • zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    You could say 'Gdzie diabeł mówi dobranoc", though I haven't used it even once in my life. In everyday language we say:
    -na uboczu
    -na odludziu
    -w ustronnym miejscu
    or colloquially, which I hear and use a lot, 'na zadupiu'
     

    zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    No, it is not archaic. But I believe idioms are generally rarely used. It definitely could be a warm-up question in that game show.
     

    Franciszek Kolpanowicz

    Senior Member
    Polish
    BTW, I did some Google queries and I found that the expression "Poza utartym szlakiem" seems to be quite common (54 300 results, many of those relating to a book with that title, but also used in other contexts).

    "poza utartym szlakiem" - Google Search

    "Z dala od utartych szlaków" also has a considerable amount of results.

    Both have the same literal and metaphorical meaning as the English 'off the beaten track'.

    I don't know if they can be qualified as idioms in Polish, though. Basic Google researched shows that there are different definitions of idiom. According to either of those from:

    Idiom a frazeologizm - Poradnia językowa PWN

    one could even argue that even English 'off the beaten track' is not an idiom, since you can infer the meaning of the expression from its parts.

    On the other hand, using the definition from:

    IDIOM | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

    you'd have to classify both as idioms.
     

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Idiom a frazeologizm - Poradnia językowa PWN

    one could even argue that even English 'off the beaten track' is not an idiom, since you can infer the meaning of the expression from its parts.

    On the other hand, using the definition from:

    IDIOM | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary

    you'd have to classify both as idioms.
    Note that "idiom" in English has two separate meanings, and one of them (1) defines the same concept as the Polish definition does. The other one (2) means something different - a particular way of expression typical of a group or an individual. None of the two English definitions , in my opinion, cover the expression "out of the beaten track".
    "Idiomatic" is also often used in the meaning "typical of a particular language", which in Polish could be rendered as "należący do zasobu frazeologicznego danego języka".
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top