it was rather noticeable as a disturbance of the atmosphere

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SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
Oak [a farmer] sighed a deep honest sigh - none the less so in that, being like the sigh of a pine plantation, it was rather noticeable as a disturbance of the atmosphere.
(Thomas Hardy; Far from the Madding Crowd)

Would you be so kind as to explain to me what exactly the author is trying to convey here?

Does he say that even though it was a deep honest sigh it was rather noticeable -- but can a deep sigh be unnoticeable? Or does he say that despite it being a deep honest sigh it was 'rather noticeable as a disturbance of the atmosphere', thus it didn't really seem honest at all?

Thanks.


 
  • wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Presumably 'none the less so' refers to 'honest'.
    Presumably the sigh of a pine plantation is the movement and noise caused by wind in the trees (perhaps not an exact parallel, since the cause is external).
    The atmosphere could be an analogy for the expression and mood of the man, or it could refer to something already established in the earlier context, such as the interrelation with another character.

    Assuming it refers to his expression or mood, I would understand it as meaning that his sigh was no less honest for being very obvious in his change of expression (you might think that a very obvious change of demeanour was exaggerated or false).
     
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