"It was the guy you have/had never liked"

roniy

Senior Member
ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
"It was the guy you have/had never liked"

Which one is the correct ???
Because I have just seen with have and I am not sure it is correct here otherwise it was "is" instead of "was", right ??
Thanks.
 
  • banni

    Member
    Op
    it depends on your situation. If you are talking about the past, you use was and had. If that is present you use is and have
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    banni said:
    it depends on your situation. If you are talking about the past, you use was and had. If that is present you use is and have

    that is what I saw
    It was the guy you have never liked .
    Is it correct ?
     

    maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    "The guy you have never liked" is a guy who is still alive.
    "The guy you had never liked" is either a guy who is dead, or a guy of whom "you" have developed a different opinion.
     

    Sayaka

    Member
    Japanese
    I think it depends on the meaning you want to express. Both are correct in grammar, with "had" it means before the time of speaking you didn't like him; but is not certain afterwards. With "have", it conveys the meaning that the speaker is quite sure you don't like that guy at any time.
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    Sayaka said:
    I think it depends on the meaning you want to express. Both are correct in grammar, with "had" it means before the time of speaking you didn't like him; but is not certain afterwards. With "have", it conveys the meaning that the speaker is quite sure you don't like that guy at any time.

    But how is connected here ?????
    I mean there is the word " was " which is in the past should all the rest of the sentence become in the past form .
    Like withthe word "thought "
    You don't say

    " I thought they are friends "
    but you say " I thought they were friends"
    and the "were" mean to the present.

    So how in my first example it works ???
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I saw that guy yesterday. It was the guy you have never liked. You still don't like him.
    I think you're OK with this one, right?

    Here's an example for the other version:
    I saw that guy yesterday. It was the guy you had never liked.... until last week, when he donated $10,000 to your favorite charity. Your opinion changed, at some time not long before I saw him yesterday.
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    Kelly B said:
    I saw that guy yesterday. It was the guy you have never liked. You still don't like him.
    I think you're OK with this one, right?

    Here's an example for the other version:
    I saw that guy yesterday. It was the guy you had never liked.... until last week, when he donated $10,000 to your favorite charity. Your opinion changed, at some time not long before I saw him yesterday.

    But the rule that works with the word " thought" Doesn't work here ???

    " I thought they were friends" and not they are

    or " I thought they had been friends" and not they have been.......

    I undersdand what you are saying and it look logical but I am a little confused with this grammar rule.
     

    roniy

    Senior Member
    ISRAEL: Fluent Hebrew ( Speak Russian, Learning English)
    And what about " It was the guy you didn't like" what is the difference among these 3 ???

    And here are more examples that confuse me :
    " I knew you didn't like/ don't like / hadn't liked it "
    " I knew you were/had been/have been about to come "
    you know what I mean
    if it begins with the past should it continue with the past or past perfect ???

    I appreciated if someone would explain me the first example and both of the examples that above "

    Thanks.
     

    Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    roniy said:
    And what about " It was the guy you didn't like" what is the difference among these 3 ???

    And here are more examples that confuse me :
    " I knew you didn't like/ don't like / hadn't liked it "
    " I knew you were/had been/have been about to come "
    you know what I mean
    if it begins with the past should it continue with the past or past perfect ???

    I appreciated if someone would explain me the first example and both of the examples that above "

    Thanks.




    Ok. This is how I understand this:
    "It was the guy you had never liked"



    This refers to the past, perhaps you began to like him.


    "It was the guy you have never liked"



    This refers to the present, say, the guy’s just left from the store where you and your friend were looking for something to eat. Then your friend says, it was the guy you have never liked. The fact that you do not like him is still true and that’s why the use of present perfect is plausible.
    In such situations it is feasible to use present tenses, e.g.:

    Roiny: Hi Ann, you have beautiful flowers in your garden.
    Ann: Thank you Roiny, I really love flowers, I could spend hours in the garden and plant new ones and then watch them growing.
    Next day:
    Roiny: I spoke with Ann yesterday, She told me she loves flowers.*
    Kelly: Yes, she is really a green-fingered gardener.



    *Note that you could also say: She told me she loved flowers. (it is also correct from a grammatical point of view)


    " I knew you didn't like/ don't like / hadn't liked it "
    Try to transform these sentences into present:
    I know you don’t like it.
    I know you don’t like it.

    I know you didn’t like it.







    " I knew you were/had been/have been about to come "
    I know you are about to come.
    I know you were about to come.



    The words in bold are grammatically correct.

    It all depends on the context, the past simple options tell you that you knew about something happening at the same time whereas had options say that something occurred in the past before you got to know it (note that this kind of English may happen to not have much to do with spoken English).


    I only hope it makes sense to you. :)

    Thomas
     
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