It would be just as true whoever I told it to

Baheth

Senior Member
Arabic
"So I've caught you at last, have I, you young thief?" said the Station Master.
"I'm not a thief," said Peter, as firmly as he could. "I'm a coal-miner."
"Tell that to the Marines," said the Station Master.
"It would be just as true whoever I told it to," said Peter.
"You're right there," said the man, who held him. "Stow your jaw, you young rip, and come along to the station."

In Nesbet's 'The Railway Children', little Peter was a thief :D .Please, explain his sentence.
 
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  • Baheth

    Senior Member
    Arabic
    I would like also to know about this Stow your jaw which the stationmaster siad. Thanks for your help.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    "Tell that to the Marines," said the Station Master.
    "It would be just as true whoever I told it to," said Peter.
    "Tell that to the Marines," is an idiom = I don't believe you - you are telling lies.

    Peter ignores the idiom and takes "Tell that to the Marines," literally, and thus replied "It would be just as true whoever I told it to," - Peter is saying "It is true, whether you believe me or not."
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Peter probably didn't even understand the expression "Tell it to the Marines", which is why he answered as he did.
     
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