it would transpire neither group was sufficiently registered or engaged

Irelia20150604

Senior Member
Chinese
The quotation comes from http://www.economist.com/blogs/bagehot/2017/04/looking-back-looking-forward-0

Quotation: My second big miss was the EU referendum. Here, to be fair, I was less sure. I warned that youth and expat turnout needed to be high enough for Remain to be safe—it would transpire neither group was sufficiently registered or engaged. But I generally expected Britain to reject Brexit. A land as tea-sippingly cautious as this, I decided as I toured Remain and Leave events in places that would all go on to vote Out, would surely not do something so rash as to quit the EU.
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Hi everyone! Does the bold sentence mean “it would turn out to be that neither youth nor expat was sufficiently registered or engaged”?
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    “it would turn out to be that neither youth nor expat was sufficiently registered or engaged”? = it would transpire neither group was sufficiently aware of the [official] polices and issues or motivated.
     

    Minnesota Guy

    Senior Member
    American English - USA
    Hi Irelia--

    "Transpire" is an interesting word. It can mean both "to happen" and "to be revealed/to become known." However, the first meaning is much, much more prevalent. My own sense is that the second meaning is becoming obsolete. I question whether anyone today would write a sentence like "What happened at the secret meeting never transpired [=became known]."

    In your sentence, there isn't much distinction between the two. It happened that neither group was engaged; or, It was revealed [through the Brexit vote] that neither group was engaged. There's a difference, but it's subtle.
     
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