It wouldn't have made it anyway

giorovv

Member
Italiano
Hi everybody, I have this sentence from the legendary novel of blade runner: "it probably was so far gone it wouldn't have made it anyway".
The context is this: a man brings a robot cat to a repair shop. The repair-man, once found out that the man who has brought the animal has unsuccessfully tried to repair it by himself before going there, say the phrase I have reported. In fact the animal (which in truth was a real cat) is dead, and what I have understood by the repairman's state is that he thinks the attempt to save the cat made by the other man would have been vain anyway. What I don't understand is the construction of the sentence: "it (the cat) probably was so far gone it (what? The attempt to save?) wouldn't have made it (what?) anyway.

There are two things I'm not sure about:
1: I believe the third "it" of the sentence refers to the possibility of the cat to survive (this means that the "it" is matched with the "made" forming a "made it" that would mean "farcela"/"sopravvivere")
2: the second "it" refers to the cat or to the man's attempt to save it?

Because, in my opinion, the sentence could be translated as: era così messo male che non ce l'avrebbe fatta comunque, or also as: era così messo male che (il tuo tentativo) sarebbe stato comunque inutile.
I know it's not a most important thing, but I like to be fussy. Thank to whoever respond! (and if you want to be fussy with my writing errors, so much the better)
 
Last edited:
  • metazoan

    Senior Member
    US English
    Yes, "to make it" means, in this case, to survive. The first two instances of "it" both refer to the cat.
    I also agree with your interpretation that he's telling the first man that no one could have saved this cat.
     

    LetsZoom

    Member
    English (American)
    It (the cat) was probably so far gone it (the cat again) wouldn't have made it (survived) anyway.

    So the first two instances of "it" refer to the cat, and the 3rd is, as you already surmised, just part of the idiomatic expression "to make it", i.e. farcela, cavarsela, or in this case, sopravvivere.

    Your first translation was correct: era così messo male che non ce l'avrebbe fatta comunque
     

    giorovv

    Member
    Italiano
    Yes, "to make it" means, in this case, to survive. The first two instances of "it" both refer to the cat.
    I also agree with your interpretation that he's telling the first man that no one could have saved this cat.
    Thank you very much!
     

    giorovv

    Member
    Italiano
    It (the cat) was probably so far gone it (the cat again) wouldn't have made it (survived) anyway.

    So the first two instances of "it" refer to the cat, and the 3rd is, as you already surmised, just part of the idiomatic expression "to make it", i.e. farcela, cavarsela, or in this case, sopravvivere.

    Your first translation was correct: era così messo male che non ce l'avrebbe fatta comunque
    Thank you letszoom very kind!
     
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