"it'd be more than my life's worth to move

Lunaya

Senior Member
French
Hi!
Still on "The International", by Glenn Patterson.
tHE narrator gets off the bus in Glengall Street (Belfast) and follows other people towards the fire that has just broken out. on his way a miserable man tells him that it apparently happened in Brand's Arcade, and when he is asked why he is not going, he points at the cardboard box on his head and it is said

"on the wall behind him, Audrey hepburn looked anguished and lovely in a white habit.
'I'd love to son, but it'd be more than my life's worth to move'"

does he mean that he would not like to move for any reason because of the beautiful photograph behind, or is it something else?

Thanks in advance!
lunaya
 
  • janitor

    Member
    English - Canada
    I think it means that it would be too difficult to move, and not worth the difficulty/pain. I haven't read the book though, so I'm not sure about the context.
     
    he points at the cardboard box on his head - Weird. Why would he have a cardboard box sitting on his head?

    Without more context, one guess is that he is fond of the photograph, attached to Audrey's image. But he points to the box, not to her. Why?

    It could also be that he has nothing to live for, why move from there.

     

    Lunaya

    Senior Member
    French
    well, it's just said, a few lines before, that he is trying to "balance a cardboard box on his head", nothing more. So I'm quite puzzled too, and actually the two interpretations seem to suit!

    I don't know if it's useful for context, but the narrator also mentions having seen the guy at the same place with the same box, for as long as he can remember.

    THanks!
    lunaya
     

    Lunaya

    Senior Member
    French
    actually yes, that can help! I had found pictures but not that one, and it seems to be the right one (if habit does mean what I thinl it means...)

    thank you!
    lunaya
     

    Lunaya

    Senior Member
    French
    that's a point. in fact he doesn't seem to be an epitome of sanity, so I guess there's no better solution...
    Thank you!
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Is there any possibility that the guy standing outside the cinema with the "cardboard box on his head" is in fact advertising the film in some way?
    Could he be carrying something like a "sandwich board"? CLICK
    ... But perhaps some kind of "overhead" equivalent?
     

    Lunaya

    Senior Member
    French
    Huuum...for me he just seems like a crazy homeless man playing with his cardboard day after day, and given his look (long beard and greasy gabardine) he does not seem like the kind of person who would be advertising anything.
     
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