itinere

ner

New Member
Spain and Spanish
Could anyone help me please?, I need to know what the word "itinere" means in English.
Thanks a lot
 
  • Annie_too_cool_for_you_:D

    New Member
    english
    I haven't really studied much Latin and I came across this title:

    in itinere

    I know itinere is journey and in is onto so would the title be on the journey or onto the journey?
    I know the 1st one sounds better but that is not always the case in Latin - I have found :p

    Anyway I hope you can help it would be appriciated.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    "in" with the ablative case (itinere) means "on".

    "in" with the accusative case (iter)"in" would mean "onto".

    So the one that sounds better to you (on the journey) is the correct one. Nice work!

    And welcome to the forum.
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    In fact, itinere is the ablative of iter (jourey or road). The ablative is used to express; the means or the instrument of an action, the starting point of a movement, object of comparison and so on. It is one of the two cases in Latin that can accompany prepositions: the other is accusative.
     

    mrmoto74

    Member
    Bilingual: Irish English and Italian
    Is in itenere used in English? I need to translate "attività di valutazione ex ante, in itinere e ex post" into English. I'm satisfied that ex ante and ex post are used in English, but I have my doubts about in itinere. I suspect "in progress" is preferred, in which case I should probably translate all three Latin expressions. Any suggestions?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Is in itenere used in English? I need to translate "attività di valutazione ex ante, in itinere e ex post" into English. I'm satisfied that ex ante and ex post are used in English, but I have my doubts about in itinere. I suspect "in progress" is preferred, in which case I should probably translate all three Latin expressions. Any suggestions?
    "In itinere" isn't a familiar term in English, though I see that it occasionally appears in legal documents. I agree that translating all three is a good idea.

    (You appear to know the translation of ex ante, in itinere e ex post. However, in case that is what you want: "beforehand, in progress, and after the fact")
     

    mrmoto74

    Member
    Bilingual: Irish English and Italian
    "In itinere" isn't a familiar term in English, though I see that it occasionally appears in legal documents. I agree that translating all three is a good idea.

    (You appear to know the translation of ex ante, in itinere e ex post. However, in case that is what you want: "beforehand, in progress, and after the fact")
    What about using interim, therefore translating the whole phrase into "Ex ante, interim and ex post evaluation activities"?

    Or do you still think "Beforehand, in progress and after the fact evaluation activities" or "Evaluation activities beforehand, in progress and after the fact" is better?

    The context is a brief explaining procedural details in the organization of a training course. The phrase is the heading of a section which details some of the evaluation processes carried out by the course organisers before (during application process), during and after the course. As it's a heading, I'd like to use something concise like "Pre-, during, and post-course evaluation activities".
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    The problem with interim (I think) is that it most often is used to describe the space between activities, so it may not be understood as you want it to be.

    As it's a heading, I'd like to use something concise like "Pre-, during, and post-course evaluation activities".
    I like this one, but you would need a prefix that means "during". At the moment I can't think of one. mid- is too specific in time, and nothing else comes to mind.

    I hope that someone else will notice this discussion and make a suggestion.

    (In my earlier post, I just intended to confirm the meanings of the Latin. I wasn't intending to recommend a particular translation in your context.)
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    mrmoto, it occurs to me that now your question is not about the Latin, but about the wording in English. This is the kind of question the English forum can help with. I suggest you post a question there.

    Tell them you have a translation from the Latin, but that you want a better wording in English. You should explain the context, give them the English wording(s) you are considering and ask for their comments and suggestions.
     

    mrmoto74

    Member
    Bilingual: Irish English and Italian
    mrmoto, it occurs to me that now your question is not about the Latin, but about the wording in English. This is the kind of question the English forum can help with. I suggest you post a question there.

    Tell them you have a translation from the Latin, but that you want a better wording in English. You should explain the context, give them the English wording(s) you are considering and ask for their comments and suggestions.
    I will get onto it straight away. Thanks a lot for all the help.
     

    pochi2007

    New Member
    English - United States
    I think itinere can also refer to one's daily commute, or travel between home and work. Anyone else concur?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I think itinere can also refer to one's daily commute, or travel between home and work. Anyone else concur?
    Do you mean that the Latin word itinere has been adopted into English? I am not familiar with this use. Do you have an example of this?
     

    Peano

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Catalan
    I think this Latin expression is used to denote an accident happened while going to work (in itinere) , not while being at work.
    This word is quite odd to me. It is based on i(re) , to go ; iter(um) is an adverbial formation, which strangely works as the name iter. In view of the ablative itinere etc., we'd rather expect a nominative itiner, itines, itinus....
     
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