It's (a?)trash day

kyotan

Senior Member
Japanese 標準語
In a city where you can only bring out the garbage to have it collected on Monday, can it be called either with or without the article?

”It's (a?)trash day"


If the context matters, will the answer differ in these situations?

1. You are twittering about taking the garbage out now. ”It's (a?)trash day."
2. You are telling your roommate what day it is tomorrow. ”It's (a?)trash day tomorrow."

Thank you.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I usually hear "trash day" used without an article. "It's a trash day tomorrow" is possible, but "Tomorrow is trash day" sounds ordinary to me.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "It's a trash day tomorrow" is possible
    It's more likely if there is more than one trash day in the period. When it's the only one, it becomes like "president." There's only one president in the country. He is president. There's only one trash day in the week. Today is trash day.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I agree with Myridon. Where I live, today (Friday) is a trash day, because trash is collected three times a week. But today is also recycling day (no "a") because items to be recycled are collected only once a week.
     

    kyotan

    Senior Member
    Japanese 標準語
    In a dialogue such as the one I wrote below, which is more commonly said, if Friday is one of the trash days on a week but every Fridays is a trash day?

    Your new roommate: "Oh, I forgot to take out the garbage yesterday!"

    You: "Don't worry.---
    1. Friday is a trash day, too.
    2. Fridays are trash days, too.

    I think if you use the plural for "Friday," it emphasizes all Fridays , but I'm not sure if it sounds strange.

    Thank you.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I think both of those would work.

    I am more likely to say the first, because I am giving information about a specific Friday, the Friday they will put out the trash because they missed the other day.
     

    kyotan

    Senior Member
    Japanese 標準語
    Hi. I just want to make sure one more thing.

    "Tomorrow is trash day" sounds ordinary to me.
    Can I switch "tomorrow" to "Friday" and say "Friday is trash day." if that is the only trash day that trash is collected once a week?

    If I can, which does it mean to native speakers with out any particular context?

    A: All Fridays are trash days.
    B: The speaker is talking about a specific Friday.

    Thank you.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Can I switch "tomorrow" to "Friday" and say "Friday is trash day." if that is the only trash day that trash is collected once a week?
    Yes.

    If I can, which does it mean to native speakers with out any particular context?

    A: All Fridays are trash days.
    "All Fridays are trash days" is the likely meaning of that remark. In my part of the world, it would be unusual for a garbage collector to show up on one Friday per month.
     
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