It's always a tricky bit of water.

Jardino

Senior Member
Korean
context :
Phil
Ha ha Passepartout! I think you've met your match. Anyway, what's our best route from here?
PP
We've got to go around the Cape of Good Hope. It's always a tricky bit of water. Plenty of ships have got caught in the strong currents and gone onto the rocks.

um... quite embarassing to see this sentence. that sentence meaning is ' going around the Cape of Good Hope is always a tricky part of water '
In other words ' going around the Cape of Good Hope is always difficult because of the current of water '
am i right?... i hope hearing from you.
 
  • suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    You understand it.

    It’s an understatement. The Cape is treacherous.
    We need more context to know why the speaker describes it this way.
     

    LVRBC

    Senior Member
    English-US, standard and medical
    A "tricky bit of water" can mean any area that is difficult to sail or otherwise navigate through in a ship. This can be due to shallow areas, strong currents, strong winds, rocks, or any other cause.
     

    Jardino

    Senior Member
    Korean
    You understand it.

    It’s an understatement. The Cape is treacherous.
    We need more context to know why the speaker describes it this way.
    am i right?...wow i'm happy to hear that. i never expected this.
    here's following context.

    Sophia

    If you allow me to steer, I can safely navigate us through these dangerous waters.
    Phil
    I think that's a great idea – don't you Passepartout? I'll put the kettle on and make some tea.
     
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