It's an acquired but nice taste.

perpend

Banned
American English
It's an acquired but nice taste.

I wrote this, and sent it off, but now I'm thinking it's redundant.

Thanks native speakers for any thoughts/input.

I guess I'm wondering if an "acquired taste" is nice by nature, and the "nice" is redundant.
 
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  • morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    How is an acquired taste automatically nice?

    Say, I like Limburger cheese. It is absolutely an acquired taste. It smells like dirty feet or old socks. Exactly like them. How's it nice? Except, that is, for me and other Limburger aficionados?

    An acquired taste is called "acquired" for exactly that reason: the object of the affection is not nice for most folks, and takes quite a bit of getting used to.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I have heard certain activities that I would call perverted, or at least kinky, described as "acquired tastes." (I am not a prude.)

    Far be it from me to judge a fellow human, but I don't think most people would consider those activities "nice."
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Thanks for thoughts. I'm really on the fence pondering this one, since I don't think of "acquired tastes" as not being nice, since they are "nice" in the eye of the acquirer (acquiree?). I hope that makes sense. Thanks again

    I guess maybe this part of the question:
    A) It's an acquired nice taste.
    B) It's an acquired bad taste.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I guess maybe this part of the question:
    A) It's an acquired nice taste.
    B) It's an acquired bad taste.
    I don't think we'd do that ... ever. :) I understand your reasoning that it's "nice" once you've acquired it (but then why would you need to mention it?) so I would expect some talk about degree of niceness, as in these examples:

    It's an acquired taste, but really nice once you're used to it.
    It's an acquired taste, but delicious once you've acquired it.
    It's an acquired taste, but nothing in the world compares once you develop a taste for it.
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    Funny, Copyright. :) But okay, I think I understand my problem which is trying to insert the "nice" where it doesn't work well. Your sentences are along the lines of what I wanted to convey. I appreciate it.
     

    screenactorsguild

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    In this sentence :
    Pears from that part of the country do not taste as ... (nice,well,satisfied ,deliciously) as those from our hometown.
    Does it have anything to do with "It's an acquired but nice taste".
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    In this sentence :
    Pears from that part of the country do not taste as ... (nice,well,satisfied ,deliciously) as those from our hometown.
    Does it have anything to do with "It's an acquired but nice taste".
    It does in the sense that we use 'nice' to describe tastes that please us, but not the other words.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    << moderator note
    Could you give some more explanations for what you had chosen?
    As for me, I think deliciously, well are also right
    => What is the difference?
    I think that you need to decide what your question is. This thread is about having acquired taste and nice in the same sentence. It is not about alternative ways of saying nice. If you want to find synonyms for nice, type it into the search box and when you get to the dictionary page select "English synonyms". Please do not continue your quest in this thread.>>
     
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