It's flowers vs They are flowers

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Themyth

New Member
Russian
Is it possible to say ' It's flowers ' or ' It's four cats indoor ' My teacher said that I could use a word they.
For example, They are cats or They are flowers, but flowers and cats are lifeless. And I've seen the third option ' These are cats '
I know it's a simple thing. But I'm so puzzled. Help meee
 
  • Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    Please give us a little information, so we can understand what you're trying to say.

    Do you mean, for example, if someone asks "What's that on the table?" your teacher says you should say "They are flowers" rather than "It's flowers?"

    (By the way, unless you're talking about dead cats or dead flowers, they're not lifeless.)
     

    Themyth

    New Member
    Russian
    Please give us a little information, so we can understand what you're trying to say.

    Do you mean, for example, if someone asks "What's that on the table?" your teacher says you should say "They are flowers" rather than "It's flowers?"

    (By the way, unless you're talking about dead cats or dead flowers, they're not lifeless.)
    Well, I'm trying to answer a question. Who is it? ' It's cats. Or when I tell something from my life. For instance, I've been to field and I've seen flowers. It was beautiful flowers. Must i say They was
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "They" is the plural of "it" for all things - living, non-living, real, unreal, ...
    It (the field) was full of beautiful flowers.
    They (the flowers) were beautiful.
     

    Themyth

    New Member
    Russian
    "They" is the plural of "it" for all things - living, non-living, real, unreal, ...
    It (the field) was full of beautiful flowers.
    They (the flowers) were beautiful.
    Thank you. This problem appeared when I took a break from studies. All in all, I mustn't say they are cats, because they replace cats. I must say These are cats
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    There's nothing inherently wrong with "They are cats."

    A: Frederica and Prescott have been very naughty today.
    B: Oh, I didn't realize you had children.
    A: They're not children; they're cats.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Do you know about the phrasal verb "There is"? We use this in English to say that something exists. It is always the word "there" followed by some form of "to be" (past, present, future, singular, plural, etc.)

    "There were many flowers in the field." is how we say that many flowers existed in the field. We don't say "it is" or "they are" or "flowers are".

    Is it possible to say ' It's flowers ' or ' It's four cats indoor ' My teacher said that I could use a word they.
    For example, They are cats or They are flowers,
    The teacher said "they" but "they" is incorrect. It should be "there":

    There are cats.
    There are flowers.
    There are four cats indoors.

    But to say "A = B" you use "is", without "there":

    What are those animals?
    They are cats.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    There's nothing wrong with "it's flowers" or "it's cats" either, in a particular context.

    Pointing at something you think is shapeless and don't know what that is:
    — What is that?
    — It's flowers.

    — What is it in the picture?
    — It's cats.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    There's nothing wrong with "it's flowers" or "it's cats" either, in a particular context.

    Pointing at something you think is shapeless and don't know what that is:
    — What is that?
    — It's flowers.

    — What is it in the picture?
    — It's cats.
    I would never say "It's cats" or "It's flowers" in AE.

    I might use "it's" in these sentences:
    -- It's a group of flowers.
    -- It's some crushed flowers.
    -- It's a pile of wilted flowers.
    -- It's a picture of cats.
    -- It's a family of cats.
    -- It's a bunch of cats.
    -- It's a group of cats.
     

    Themyth

    New Member
    Russian
    Do you know about the phrasal verb "There is"? We use this in English to say that something exists. It is always the word "there" followed by some form of "to be" (past, present, future, singular, plural, etc.)

    "There were many flowers in the field." is how we say that many flowers existed in the field. We don't say "it is" or "they are" or "flowers are".



    The teacher said "they" but "they" is incorrect. It should be "there":

    There are cats.
    There are flowers.
    There are four cats indoors.

    But to say "A = B" you use "is", without "there":

    What are those animals?
    They are cats.
    The question was "Who is it"
    They're cats or It's cats or These are cats
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In what context are you asking 'Who is it?'


    I can't think of a context in which 'Who is it?' could be answered by 'They're cats' or 'It's cats' or 'These are cats.'
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    There's nothing wrong with "it's flowers" or "it's cats" either, in a particular context.

    Pointing at something you think is shapeless and don't know what that is:
    — What is that?
    — It's flowers.

    — What is it in the picture?
    — It's cats.
    The second question is a little strange without context to explain the use of "it", but the answers are fine:

    — What's in the picture?
    — (It's) cats.

    — What's that in the picture?
    — It's cats.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Thank you for the replies.
    I meant that if the speaker doesn't know that those are several objects. Maybe he can't make out the picture, so he refers to that as "it/that". And the second speaker when replying, echoing the 1st speaker question refers to it by "it/that" too: "It's cats." I don't think it'd be more idiomatic if he replied to "What is it?" by "These ar cats.", would it?
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Thank you for the replies.
    I meant that if the speaker doesn't know that those are several objects. Maybe he can't make out the picture, so he refers to that as "it/that". And the second speaker when replying, echoing the 1st speaker question refers to it by "it/that" too: "It's cats." I don't think it'd be more idiomatic if he replied to "What is it?" by "These ar cats.", would it?
    No.
     
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