It's like there is a sandy wind

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ryooster

Senior Member
Korean
Dear all,

It's been a long time!

When we have a job interview, most interviewer often ask this question to break the ice.

Q: How is the weather?
To this question, can I use the pattern of "It is like that~"

Example: It's like there is a sandy wind.
It's like that it still cold

Thanks in advance
ryooster
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    First, I must say that this is a pretty strange question and if I didn't want a job I would simply say, "You need to get out more." :)

    But since you must answer, keep it simple. It's like being asked, "How are you?" The best response is, "Fine, thanks." Or, "Fine, thanks. And you?"

    How's the weather?
    Just great. I love the fog/sun/snow/sleet/hail.
    (Pick one... and remember the "Just great" means you're happy with all sorts of weather, just as you'll be happy with all sorts of challenges in your new job.) :D

    Your patterns are not right, I'm afraid. You wouldn't, for example, say, "It's like there is sun." There is no "like" to it -- there is either sun or there isn't. You could say, "It's sunny" but I think that's too literal a response. The person asking must surely know what the weather is, so I would imagine he or she would prefer your response to the weather; hence, "It's great. I've never seen so much snow." Or, "It's great -- good day for an interview."
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Are you sure that's the absolutely correct way that question is asked?

    In AE, it sounds weird.

    How's the weather? seems to invite a smart-alecky reply because it's such a dumb strange question.

    It assumes that the person who asks it doesn't know enough to look out the window and see for himself.

    When we ask this question in AE, we ask about weather in relation to how it's affecting us.

    Maybe you mean, "How do you like this weather we're having?"
     

    ryooster

    Senior Member
    Korean
    The situation is like this.

    Someone has been in the house. and I just got into the room from the outside. Then someone ask me, how's (the?) weather (outside)?
    Do you guys think that this question sound weird? If yes, then what would be a good expression?
    When I ask that question, I expect some answes like "it's very chilly or I think we will have snow".

    Thanks
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think we've gone from an interviewer with an office view (in my mind :)) to a guy in a windowless backroom. So my world has shifted a bit, but I'll try to move with it...

    If the backroom boy has been shielded for some hours from rapidly changing weather conditions, then he can ask, "How's the weather outside?" And you can tell him -- Grab your sled or Put on some shorts or whatever.

    Now don't ask me why we say "outside," but we often do. :D
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    [...]
    Q: How is the weather?
    To this question, can I use the pattern of "It is like that~"

    Example: It's like there is a sandy wind.
    It's like that it still cold
    My young went through a stage of putting like's into their conversation like larding needles into soft steaks, to my very considerable distress. Instead of saying It's raining, they had to say It's like raining. They seem to have grown out of it now, and I never mention it.

    Your suggestion, Ryooster, reminds me of those deplorable times. The like is performing no function outside rhetoric, and the expression it is that it is raining would be unidiomatic, so my advice is that you stick to idiomatic formulae, as examined in those links given by Panjandrum.
     
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