It's my pleasure. [old fashioned?]

Peacedreamer

Member
Korean
Hi, I'd like to hear your opinions. I've heard a native English speaker say, "'It's my pleasure' is old fashioned now. ". I can understand there are many modern ways to respond to thanking, but is a simple and classical 'It's my pleasure' out of date now and does the expression sound uncool? What I'd like to know is if it's a personal preference or common tendency. Thanks in advance.
 
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  • DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    There are more "modern" alternatives, but no: people do still say it in BE - usually abbreviated to just "My pleasure!"
     

    Susan Y

    Senior Member
    British English
    "My pleasure" is my standard response to being thanked. I admit I am not exactly "cool" but I have noticed that "(My) pleasure" is Ed Sheeran's standard response when he is thanked at the end of an interview, and he's pretty cool...
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    OMG. Now I'm the older crowd and formal. What young whippersnappers.

    I use both: "It's my pleasure" and "my pleasure".

    The phrases are not dead, nor am I. They are polite and current phrases in American English.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    In British English I don't habitually reply to "Thank you". I feel "You're welcome" is very American, but sometimes if I am thanked by a non-native speaker of English I might say "It's my pleasure" - only because I know that they expect some kind of verbal response.

    I think "It's my pleasure" can also be used to reassure someone that no payment is required.
    A. I'll help you with that heavy luggage.
    B. Thanks very much. (Looks in his pocket for a coin or two to tip the helpful stranger.)
    A. No, no - it's my pleasure.
     

    xuliang

    Senior Member
    Chinese Mandarin
    Hi, I also have a question about the response to "thank you" in a bit formal business occasion: One Saturday a customer came to visit our factory. (We usually don't work on Saturday) Becasue his schedule was tight, and he needed to go back to the US the next day, so he had to schedule the visit on Saturday. When he arrived, he said "we really appreciate your time and we are sorry for coming on Saturday".

    I don't know how to respond here properly. I don't have to be too formal. (this is an old customer). I wanted to let him know it's no problem with us. We welcomed his visit.
    "Never mind. We welcome your visit".

    Is this natural? Is it too fromal? Thank you.
     
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    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I feel that "never mind" is rather dismissive and unwelcoming. "It's no trouble. We welcome your visit."
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Here is another thread on responses (including No problem and Don't mention it) to "Thank you" in which "My pleasure" was also discussed. "The pleasure was all mine" is particularly charming in some cases:D
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Like velisarius, I do not normally give a verbal response to 'thank you' - a smile does the job nicely. If a standard response is required, I might say 'Not at all', 'Pleasure' (rather than 'It's my pleasure') or even 'No problem' or the more Australian 'No worries'. I know some people don't like the last two - but I have survived unscathed!

    For Xuliang's situation, I agree with Andy. And this is one occasion when 'It's not a problem (at all)' might also work.
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    I too like "It's not a problem." It might be mentioned that there are many ways of responding. To "Thank you for spending all this time with me," reply along the lines,
    "It's been enjoyable for me as much as you."


    Like velisarius, I do not normally give a verbal response to 'thank you' - a smile does the job nicely. If a standard response is required, I might say 'Not at all', 'Pleasure' (rather than 'It's my pleasure') or even 'No problem' or the more Australian 'No worries'. I know some people don't like the last two - but I have survived unscathed!

    For Xuliang's situation, I agree with Andy. And this is one occasion when 'It's not a problem (at all)' might also work.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't regard 'My pleasure' or 'It's my pleasure' as very standard BE responses to being thanked. If I heard either of them, I'd wonder when they went out of fashion, and I was a little surprised at other BE answers here.

    On the other hand, I'm very used to hearing 'It's a pleasure' in these circumstances, and that is certainly something I might say, or 'It's a great pleasure'.
     
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    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I have been known to say "My pleasure" a rather pointed tone if someone stalks through a door I have held open for them, or stood aside for, and they don't say thanks. I suppose I think it points up their rudeness (by being rude myself :eek: )
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    "My pleasure!" is alive and thriving here in New York as a reply to an expression of thanks for doing someone a favor or helping them with something.
     

    Peacedreamer

    Member
    Korean
    Thank you, JulianStuart. I had checked that thread before posting. But thanks all the same. :)

    Thank you, natKretep.

    Thank you, Thomas Tompion.

    Rover KE, that was funny. :) I like funny stories, thank you very much.

    Hi, xuliang. I'm glad you too were helped by these kind native English speakers here as well as me.:) I'm really grateful that all these kind intelligent English speaking people don't mind spending their precious time helping us who want to learn correct English.:)

    Suzi br, that was funny too. Very British, sarcastic. I find it cool.:) And thank you, Parla, for your help.
     
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    Phil-Olly

    Senior Member
    Scotland, English
    I too like "It's not a problem." It might be mentioned that there are many ways of responding. To "Thank you for spending all this time with me," reply along the lines,
    "It's been enjoyable for me as much as you."
    I like the idea of using a response appropriate to the situation.
    For example:

    "Would it be possible to send somebody over within the hour to fix the boiler?"
    "No problem."
    I'm okay with that, because it might have been a problem!

    "Thank you so much for spending the day with me."
    "My pleasure!"
    Again, the respondent genuinely enjoyed the day as much as the person expressing gratitude.

    However, I admit to being irritated by:
    "One adult day return to Central Station."
    "No problem."
    Whoever suggested the purchase of a train ticket was some kind of problem?
     
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