It's quite amazing.

sitifan

Senior Member
Hokkien & Mandarin Chinese
I'm quite exhausted.
It's quite amazing.
His English is quite perfect.


Does "quite" mean "completely" in the above sentences?
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In all of those examples, quite does indeed imply something like completely. A viable substitute in each case would be absolutely:

    I'm absolutely exhausted. / It's absolutely amazing. / His English is absolutely perfect.​

    But of course it also has the contrary meaning of fairly (i.e. only to a certain extent). It’s the context that usually shows which is meant.

    I’m quite tired, but not so tired that I want to go to bed just yet.​
     

    sitifan

    Senior Member
    Hokkien & Mandarin Chinese
    I’m quite tired, but not so tired that I want to go to bed just yet.​
    What does "just" mean here? (solved)
    -----
    just yet
    1. right now; immediately, straightaway
      I want to learn how to drive a motorbike, but I won't do it just yet; I've got other projects to wrap up first.

    Usage notes​

     
    Last edited:

    Wordy McWordface

    Senior Member
    SSBE (Standard Southern British English)
    I'm quite exhausted.
    It's quite amazing.
    His English is quite perfect.


    Does "quite" mean "completely" in the above sentences?
    The answer, as you can see from responses #2 and #3, depends on whether the speaker/listener uses AmE or BrE.

    As a BrE speaker, I agree with you and LB that it does mean 'completely'. In BrE, quite has two meanings. With gradeable adjectives it means 'fairly', and with ungradeable or "extreme" adjectives it means 'completely'.

    AmE does not make this distinction. For AmE speakers, quite is an intensifier with a meaning similar to 'very'. This explains JillN's response.
     
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