It's seen a bit of mileage

JungKim

Senior Member
Korean
Here's a quote from The Avengers, a 2002 film:

(Stark just took off his armor, facing Loki.)
Loki: Please tell me you're going to appeal to my humanity.
Stark: Actually, I'm planning to threaten you.
Loki: You should have left your armor on for that.
Stark: Yeah. It's seen a bit of mileage, and you've got the glow stick of destiny.

Now, what exactly does Stark mean by "It's seen a bit of mileage"?
It seems to me that "it" is referring to Stark's armor, which he just took off.
But I'm not quite sure about the whole thing in bold.
 
  • Tazzler

    Senior Member
    American English
    Mileage is the number of miles a car has driven and can be extended to mean the amount of time something has been used.
     

    JungKim

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Mileage is the number of miles a car has driven and can be extended to mean the amount of time something has been used.
    I know what mileage means. What I'm asking is about the whole sentence: "It's seen a bit of mileage."
    Specifically, why have "it" as the subject?
    Also, why use the verb "see" here?
    Is this combination a common thing?
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    It refers to the armor, and "see (some) mileage" is just the way we say it, like: This suit has seen better days.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Thank you, Barque. I read 'the suit has seen better days' wrong.
    You're welcome. I'm not sure how you read the suit sentence but it means: This suit used to look good earlier, when it was new, but it's now an old one and has seen a lot of use, and it shows. The time when it was new and still looked good was its "better days".
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I think his meaning is that it is old and wouldn't make much difference if he was wearing it or not.
     
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