it's snowy

< Previous | Next >

simonaj

Senior Member
italian, Italy
If anyone asks for: "what's the weather like?" is it correct to answer : "it's snowy" or "it's rainy"? Or is it better to say: "It's snowing" or "it's raining".
Thank you.
 
  • fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    What's the weather like there today?
    it's raining/it's snowing = precipitation is falling from the sky today

    What's the weather like in Italy?
    it's rainy/it's snowy = it rains/snows frequently

    There are other variations, but this is the most simplistic and clear (IMHO) distinction.

    Cheers.
     

    comsci

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan(Yankees 40 Wang)
    In the example above, I'd say you use "progressive tense"(like raining/snowing) to specify/stress something that's happening at present. When you omit using it, it goes to generalization as to ask "What's the weather generally like in a specific country?" That's my understanding to it IMHO. :)

    A: What's the weather like in Taiwan?
    B: Well I'd say it's pretty much rainy and moist at this time of the year.
    A: I guess the same token goes to misty in London.

    A: What's the weather like today/as of now?
    B: Can't you see for yourself? It's raining cats and dogs. :)
    A: Oh yeah, duh, foolish me!
     

    JShambach

    Senior Member
    English USA
    snowy/rainy: there is snow on the ground or it is raining sporadically

    snowing/raining: I agree with fenixpollo - it is actively snowing or raining at the moment

    To answer a question, usually I say, "It's snowy/rainy today" or "Right now it's snowing/raining."
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    If you're referring to the current moment, I'd say it would sound unusual to say "it's rainy." I mean, yes, you could say "it's really rainy right now" but most people would just say "it's raining."

    It gets really rainy here in the winter. In fact, it's raining right now.

    I think I agree with Fenixpollo's distinction.
     

    comsci

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan(Yankees 40 Wang)
    For me, I'd say it's pretty much "contextually dependent." In other words, it heavily depends on the people who engage in this particular conversation at time of speaking. In a sense, yes, it could be used accordingly. :)
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    If you want to say that it's not i.e. snowing but it probably will, use an expression like "it looks like it's going to snow"
     

    simonaj

    Senior Member
    italian, Italy
    Maybe "rainy" and "snowy" are used in this way because there are correspondent verbs of them. But I can say "it's cold/hot/close etc. even when I'm refering at the corrent moment. Is it right?
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    raining = participle (verb)
    rainy = adjective

    Since these are different parts of speech, they are used in different ways: rainy to describe the quality of a place or a day; raining to talk about the (current) action of the rain falling.
     

    ireney

    Modistra
    Greek Greece Mod of Greek, CC and CD
    simonaj said:
    Maybe "rainy" and "snowy" are used in this way because there are correspondent verbs of them. But I can say "it's cold/hot/close etc. even when I'm refering at the corrent moment. Is it right?
    You can certainly use cold/hot etc (though I assume you do not mean to use "close" it reference to weather :) )

    The reason you cannot use "rainy" or "snowy" the same way is because of their meaning. Both of them mean that rain or snow are frequent. A rainy day i.e. is a day during which it rains a bit in the morning then it rains some more later on etc.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    simonaj said:
    But I can say "it's cold/hot/close etc. even when I'm refering at the corrent moment. Is it right?
    Yes, of course you can. ("Close" has nothing to do with the weather though.)
     

    simonaj

    Senior Member
    italian, Italy
    But close means there are clouds. Is it really wrong? And can I say either "there is fog" , "there is hot" or "there is wind"?
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Thanks for the info about "close" - I was not aware of this meaning before.

    Simonaj, you would say "it is foggy" and "it is windy" (although "there's a lot of fog" and "there's a lot of wind" could be said as well).
    "There is hot" is incorrect.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    simonaj said:
    But close means there are cloudsA. Is it really wrong? And can I say either "there is fog"B , "there is hot"C or "there is wind"D?
    A - no for me it means muggy, sticky.
    B - yes, but it's foggy is much more normal.
    C - no, it is hot.
    D - no, it's windy
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Do people really say it is rainy?
    I know Bob Dylan did. But around here we don't describe the weather, or today, as rainy. If it is raining a lot it is a wet day, not a rainy day.

    (I understand close to mean exactly what timpeac describes)
     

    brian&me

    Senior Member
    Chinese - China
    Please note that this post and the following ones have been added to a previous thread on the same topic. DonnyB - moderator.
    It’s snowy.


    I wonder if this sentence necessarily means that it’s snowing. If it’s not snowing but there’s snow everywhere on the ground, I wonder if I could still say it’s snowing.

    Many thanks in advance.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top