It's too late now/Now is too late

Pirulo1234

Senior Member
Spanish
Hello everybody,

I know the adverb "today" can be used as the subject of a sentence or at the end of it. For example: Today is friday/It's friday today

I'd like to know if this rule is also applied with the adverb "now":

A) It's too late now
B) Now is too late


Are both correct? If not, what difference is there between "now" and "today"?

Thanks a million.
 
  • Agró

    Senior Member
    Spanish-Navarre
    Both are correct.

    Today and now can be both nouns:
    From WR dictionary (Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers).
    now n
    1. the present moment or time: now is the time to go
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    We wouldn't generally say "now is too late," although we might use it once in a while. We could, however, say "Now it's too late," and there's essentially no difference between that (except perhaps in emphasis) and "It's too late now."
     

    Pirulo1234

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    We wouldn't generally say "now is too late," although we might use it once in a while. We could, however, say "Now it's too late," and there's essentially no difference between that (except perhaps in emphasis) and "It's too late now."
    Interesting...
    In that case, would you also say "Today it's Friday" instead of "Today is Friday"?
    Thanks
     

    plump7

    Member
    English- USA
    Interesting...
    In that case, would you also say "Today it's Friday" instead of "Today is Friday"?
    Thanks
    We actually wouldn’t say that. It doesn’t sound horrible, but just a little weird.

    I’m not a grammar expert, but I can tell you why I think it sounds weird even though “Now it’s too late” sounds normal.

    With the sentence “Now it’s too late,” “it” acts as the subject and refers to an unspecified noun (a person, place, or thing). We intuitively interpret “now” as an adverb and not as a noun in this case.

    With the sentence “Today it’s Friday”, the use of “it” is strange since we can interpret “Today” as a more specific noun than “it”. In other words, we interpret “today” as a noun instead of an adverb, and we therefore don’t need to say “it” to refer to another more unspecific noun. We would instead just say “Today is Friday”
     

    gengo

    Senior Member
    American English
    A) It's too late now
    B) Now is too late
    As said above, both are grammatically correct, but B is far less common than A, as shown in the graph here.
    Interesting...
    In that case, would you also say "Today it's Friday" instead of "Today is Friday"?
    I agree that the first one sounds odd, although there is no grammatical reason for that. Sometimes we just say things a certain way, by convention. A Japanese person once asked me this: "We say 'Yesterday was Saturday,' and 'Today is Sunday,' so why don't we say 'Tomorrow will be Monday'?" My answer was that we just don't say that (we say "tomorrow is Monday").

    Language is illogical sometimes.
     

    wowouo

    New Member
    English - American
    As mentioned before, "now" can be an adverb, but it can also be a noun. In the sentence "It's too late now", "now" functions as an adverb of time, telling when something is too late. In the sentence "Now is too late". It functions as a noun telling us, arguably, what is too late. This is a nuance that is not usually necessary, and sounds kind of stilted.

    Since adverbs of time (specifically ones telling us when and ones of duration) go at the end of the sentence when there is no emphasis "It's too late now" would be the most common way to say it. However, like other adverbs of time, you may move it to the beginning of the sentence for emphatic purposes. Typically, in written English, we would add a comma to indicate that the adverb was "out of place": "Now, it's too late." I hope this helps!
     
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