I've been worried / I was worried

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New Member
Português - Brasil
Ex.1 (He is still injured): I heard that you were injured. I was so worried.

Ex.2 (He is still injured): I heard you were injured. I've been so worried.


Question: If I want to give the impression that I'm still worried, are these two examples acceptable?
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Neither says that you are still worried, and you probably don't want to say that you are still worried, not face to face with the person. Most people don't like to be told that someone else is worrying about them.

    The difference between them is slight. The present perfect perhaps indicates a greater degree of worry, or perhaps indicates that your worry hasn't entirely dissipated upon seeing the person, but really the degree of worry is better indicated with intonation, and in most situations I think the two sentences are interchangeable.

    Including or omitting "that" in the first sentence makes no difference.
     

    $$$

    New Member
    Português - Brasil
    Neither says that you are still worried, and you probably don't want to say that you are still worried, not face to face with the person. Most people don't like to be told that someone else is worrying about them.

    The difference between them is slight. The present perfect perhaps indicates a greater degree of worry, or perhaps indicates that your worry hasn't entirely dissipated upon seeing the person, but really the degree of worry is better indicated with intonation, and in most situations I think the two sentences are interchangeable.

    Including or omitting "that" in the first sentence makes no difference.
    Thank you friend. My question was whether really these two ways of talking could be used interchangeably in this context, because my intention was to say: I was worried but I don't want to be rude to say that I'm not worried anymore, because the person is still hurt. I don't want to give this impression, understand?
     
    Last edited:

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Ex.2 (He is still injured): I heard you were injured. I've been so worried.


    Question: If I want to give the impression that I'm still worried, are these two examples acceptable?
    I've been so worried definitely suggests to me that you are still worried about him when you say this. Your example demonstrates a standard use of the present perfect. It is similar to this one: I've been ill for days. = I became ill several days ago and I am still ill now.

    I was so worried suggests that you are no longer worried.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Your example demonstrates a standard use of the present perfect. It is similar to this one: I've been ill for days. = I became ill several days ago and I am still ill now.
    I disagree. There is no time period in the sentence being asked about here, so it is more like "I've been ill." Are you still ill?

    In the real world, we don't use these expressions with such precision, and I agree that the present perfect suggests more worry than the past tense, and that the worry may not have entirely disappeared, but I think it is a mistake to say that the present perfect means that you are still worried.
     
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    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    If I want to give the impression that I'm still worried, are these two examples acceptable?
    Are you primarily interested in which tense to use with "worried" or are you interested in knowing what to say to a person who has been injured and is still injured?

    If you're interested in the idiomatic thing to say to an injured person, we'd say "I'm so sorry to hear that you've been injured." I wouldn't being the verb "worry" into it at all.
     

    $$$

    New Member
    Português - Brasil
    Are you primarily interested in which tense to use with "worried" or are you interested in knowing what to say to a person who has been injured and is still injured?

    If you're interested in the idiomatic thing to say to an injured person, we'd say "I'm so sorry to hear that you've been injured." I wouldn't being the verb "worry" into it at all.
    Let's say I heard that my friend was injured and I found him hospitalized and I mentioned the Ex.1 or the Ex.2 with the intention of saying that despite what happened I care about him.

    My question is if these two examples are acceptable when wanting to demonstrate this.
     
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    Tegs

    Mód ar líne
    English (Ireland)
    They are grammatically fine, but they both imply to me that now that you've seen your friend, you are no longer worried. Perhaps because they are less injured than you thought they'd be, or perhaps because they are recovering well.
     
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