I've got a bit of a dodgy stomach [have got]

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
get
to become ill with a disease, virus, etc
I can't come in to work today - I've got a bit of a dodgy stomach.

Cambridge dictionary

Can't the "have got" be misunderstood as the verb "to have got" instead of "to get" in the present perfect?
Thanks.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I've got means I have. It won't be misunderstood by native English speakers. As PaulQ says, the "got" is redundant and therefore unnecessary -- it's just something we say.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    But I don't understand... This sentence is put under a definition of "get"..:confused:

    Another example from there: "When I've got a cold, I don't feel like eating."
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    If you use have got with an illness (among other things!), the normal meaning is have.
    Some people may say I've got a cold meaning I've caught a cold, but this is not what the phrase usually means.

    As for redundancy, where would we be without it?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    To get is a utility verb. It appears in many constructions and has hundreds of meanings and nuances. What you are seeing is one possible use.

    As a child, I was taught to avoid "to get" because, most of the time, there is a better verb or it is not needed at all. As a student of English, I suppose it is necessary to recognise what "to get" means in many contexts. You have my sympathy.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I don't believe "I've got a cold/measles/whooping cough/the mumps/appendicitis/etc." is British English. Now "dodgy" sounds pretty British to me. :)
     
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